Outdoors

Radio: Idaho official explains wilderness wolf trapping

In this 1987 photo released by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, a wolf stands in the snow near Ishpeming, Mich. Once hunted to near extinction, gray wolves in the western Great Lakes region and the northern Rocky Mountains have rebounded so successfully they no longer need federal protection. (courtesy)
In this 1987 photo released by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, a wolf stands in the snow near Ishpeming, Mich. Once hunted to near extinction, gray wolves in the western Great Lakes region and the northern Rocky Mountains have rebounded so successfully they no longer need federal protection. (courtesy)

PREDATORS — Idaho officials are still confronting public concern over efforts to curb predation, including eliminating two wolf packs, in order to bring back once-prized wilderness elk herds from extreme low levels.

Public Radio sat down with and Idaho Fish and Game official for this report.

Idaho FWP official discusses decision to remove wolves in wilderness
Mike Keckler, chief of communications for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game  talks  with Sally Mauk of Montana Public Radio about the state's decision to send a hired hunter into the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness to remove two wolf packs. Part 1 of a 2-part series.
—Montana Public Radio




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Rich Landers

Rich Landers’ Outdoors blog


Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.


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