Outdoors

Are state efforts to grab federal lands sincere?

This photo released by the National History Museum of Utah, shows the cliff in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument beneath which the fossilized skeleton of a newly-discovered dinosaur, Lythronax argestes, was found in southern Utah. Scientists say the bone-crushing carnivore is the equivalent of the great uncle of the T. rex. (Mark Loewen / Natural History Museum Of Utah)
This photo released by the National History Museum of Utah, shows the cliff in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument beneath which the fossilized skeleton of a newly-discovered dinosaur, Lythronax argestes, was found in southern Utah. Scientists say the bone-crushing carnivore is the equivalent of the great uncle of the T. rex. (Mark Loewen / Natural History Museum Of Utah)

PUBLIC LANDS — Cutting through the facade of state's rights land grab efforts…

Utah's quest for federal public lands a simple fundraising ploy
Given the mild response from the members of the Utah Federalism Commission to an assistant attorney general's announcement that the state does not intend to pursue a lawsuit to make the federal government hand over management of its lands as required under the 2012 Utah Transfer of Public Lands act, they're aware that the legislation, as well as Rep. Ken Ivory's work and that of his American Lands Council, are designed to collect votes and cash, and not about seeking a solution to an actual problem.
—Salt Lake Tribune




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Rich Landers

Rich Landers’ Outdoors blog


Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.


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