Outdoors blog

Statistics to help Montana count wolves

In this 1987 photo released by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, a wolf stands in the snow near Ishpeming, Mich. Once hunted to near extinction, gray wolves in the western Great Lakes region and the northern Rocky Mountains have rebounded. (courtesy)
In this 1987 photo released by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, a wolf stands in the snow near Ishpeming, Mich. Once hunted to near extinction, gray wolves in the western Great Lakes region and the northern Rocky Mountains have rebounded. (courtesy)

PREDATORS -- The bottom line is that state's can't afford to continue spending millions of dollars to monitor wolf populations. There has to be an easier more affordable way.

Montana researchers come up with a new way to count wolves
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks' requirement to provide minimum wolf counts to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service expires in two years, and researchers from the state wildlife agency and the University of Montana have developed a new statistical technique to come up with wolf numbers.
--Helena Independent Record




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Rich Landers
Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.

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