Outdoors

Weather change: birds shifting gears from survival to procreation

A wild turkey gobbler fans its tail on a sunny March 6 morning in the foothills of Mount Spokane. (Rich Krenkel)
A wild turkey gobbler fans its tail on a sunny March 6 morning in the foothills of Mount Spokane. (Rich Krenkel)

WILDLIFE WATCHING —  This morning's sunshine — capping the past week of weather extremes —  seems to be bringing on an epidemic of spring fever.

A Mount Spokane landowner said he noticed the first bluebird of the season flying past his window this morning.

Within an hour, he emailed the photo (above) of wild turkeys that have been frequenting his yard for weeks. But today, love was in the air.

Just snapped this pic, first time this season I’ve seen them spread their feathers. There were 13 of them feeding and all of a sudden they started chasing one another in circles and back and forth, finally one stopped long enough to get a pic. Guess spring is really here!!!

Also, Melissa Rose in Ferry County reports:

We could sure tell the difference going out side this morning up here. While there had been very little bird sound/activity all winter this morning we experienced a riot of both!”

And this just came in from Spokane Audubon member Kim Thorburn

Yesterday morning when feeding the chickens, I caught a glimpse of an unusual bird hop up from the ground.  Expecting western bluebirds any moment, I went to inspect and found a lovely male spotted towhee.  While they breed in Riverside State Park nearby, I've only seen one previously in my yard during a fall migration.  He's also a bit early.  He spent the day foraging with the ga-zillion dark-eyed juncos underneath the feeder, escaping to our slash piles when necessary.  This morning, he's sunning himself atop our Colorado blue spruce, a favored songbird roost tree.
 
The western bluebirds (a pair) did arrive yesterday at 4:00 PM.  There was also a killdeer along the 9-Mile Reservoir in Riverside State Park.

Tundra swans are pouring into the region, hitting all of the open water from Lake Spokane to the Colville Valley and Pend Oreille River.

And this report just in from Ron Dexter, also in the Mount Spokane foothills:

This morning as I returned from getting our morning paper, I found a male Western Bluebird perched upon our 7 ft tall carved bear. I looked around and found the female on the TV antenna. I went into the house and walked over to the front window where I read the paper, and there on a Serviceberry bush just outside the window was our first of the year Say's Phoebe. The mate usually shows up in the next week or two.
Spring has sprung, I guess.




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Rich Landers

Rich Landers’ Outdoors blog


Rich Landers writes and photographs stories for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including a Sunday feature section and a Thursday column. He also writes the Outdoors Blog.


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