Arrow-right Camera

Outdoors blog

Video: Clark Fork Delta restoration combats erosion of wildlife habitat

Katherine Cousins, Idaho Department of Fish and Game biologist, boats through the $6 million Clark Fork Delta restoration project on Tuesday near Clark Fork, Idaho. Restoration work started last fall, targeting 680 threatened acres of the delta. The intent is to preserve the delta and prevent fertile shorelines from eroding. Cousins and her team put in 90,000 plants. (Dan Pelle)
Katherine Cousins, Idaho Department of Fish and Game biologist, boats through the $6 million Clark Fork Delta restoration project on Tuesday near Clark Fork, Idaho. Restoration work started last fall, targeting 680 threatened acres of the delta. The intent is to preserve the delta and prevent fertile shorelines from eroding. Cousins and her team put in 90,000 plants. (Dan Pelle)

HABITAT -- A short documentary film chronicles the multi-million-dollar effort to shore up islands and wildlife habitat that have been extensively eroding in the Clark Fork Delta where the Clark Fork River meets Lake Pend Oreille near Hope, Idaho.

Roughly 12-15 acres have been lost annually because of impacts from the operation of several dams on the watershed, says Kathy Cousins, Idaho Fish and Game Department mitigation biologist. The result has been losses of soil, native riparian and wetland vegetation, as well as the quantity and quality of fish, waterfowl and wildlife habitat.

"The majority of the erosion of the delta soils is the result of wave action and water level fluctuations of Lake Pend Oreille due to the operation of the Albeni Falls dam, located on the Pend Oreille River near the Washington/Idaho border," Cousins says.
"In addition, about 15–25 percent of all habitat loss in the delta is attributed to the operation of the Cabinet Gorge/Noxon Rapid hydroelectric projects located upstream on the Clark Fork River.

"The altered hydrology in the Clark Fork River and delta has also resulted in changes in the wetland and aquatic vegetation cover. Reed canarygrass, an invasive non-native now dominates in all delta habitat areas, such that many of the delta’s wetland functions are severely impaired.

"A restoration project was proposed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and their partners to protect areas vulnerable to erosion while improving and diversifying key riparian and wetland habitats behind the protection to restore ecological function in the delta."

The following nine-minute documentary was produced by Scott Rulander and submitted to the University of Idaho Film Festival in October. “Clark Fork River Delta; Restoring Wildlife Habitat For Future Generations” features some of the work completed and the importance of the delta to the fish and wildlife resources.

The film shows some of the construction completed for a portion of Phase I of the restoration project. The construction began in November 2014, and was completed by March 2015.

Construction efforts include:

  • Island shoreline rock protection completed: Area 3 = 17,600 linear feet and Area 7 = 2,890 linear feet
  • More than 50,000 tons riprap rock placed in Area 3 and Area 7
  • 51,000 willows embedded in rock
  • 330 trees with root-wads embedded into fill/rock
  • 13 Bendway weirs constructed on Area 3
  • 40 acres raised on Area 3
  • A total of 100,549 plants were planted between April and June of 2015.
  • Approximately 20,813 shrubs and trees were planted by volunteers, school groups and IDFG staff.
  • A total of 79,736 emergent plugs were planted by volunteers and two crews from the Northwest Youth Corp.
  • The invasive reed canarygrass was treated with prescribed burn; the grass clumps were also sprayed with systemic herbicides. 

This video follows an enormous undertaking to reverse the delta's decline and set the stage for long-term restoration.

Canoeists and kayakers also should note that the restoration is keeping the Clark Fork Delta ducky for paddlers.




You must be logged in to post comments. Please log in here or click the comment box below for options.

comments powered by Disqus
« Back to Outdoors blog
Outdoors blog

Rich Landers writes and photographs stories and columns for a wide range of outdoors coverage, including Outdoors feature sections on Sunday and Thursday.