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Sirens & Gavels

Posts tagged: cows

Roving cows drink Mass. backyard brew

BOXFORD, Mass. (AP) — Police say a roving group of cows crashed a small gathering in a Massachusetts town and bullied the guests for their beer.

Boxford police Lt. James Riter says he was responding to a call for loose cows on Sunday and spotted them in a front yard.

Riter says the herd high-tailed it for the backyard and then he heard screaming. He says when he ran back there he saw the cows had chased off some young adults and were drinking their beers.

Riter says the cows had knocked the beer cans over on a table and were lapping up what spilled. He says they even started rooting around the recycled cans for some extra drops.

Riter says the cows' owner and some friends herded the cows back home.

Fiberglass cow statue stolen in CdA

Police in Coeur d'Alene are investigating the theft of a large fiberglass cow statue from outside an antique store.

Jeffrey Gagnon, who owns Paris Flea Market at 1815 N. 4th St., has a broken piece of the cow's tail that can be used to positively identify the statue, Officer Bruce Reed noted in his report.

Gagnon said the red and white statue, which was made in the 1940s, was secured with chains that were bolted to the ground but had been cut. The theft occurred between 6:30 p.m. and 9 p.m. Friday, Gagnon told police.

Gagnon said the statue was worth about $2,300. He obtained it about two years ago and said it'd be easy for someone to carry it away because it only weights about 70 pounds.

Anyone with information on the theft should call the Coeur d'Alene Police Department at (208) 769-2320.
  

Cow hot-hoofs it from police near Philly

An undated photo shows the white cow escaped from Madina Poultry in Upper Darby, Pa., during loading last Saturday. (AP Photo/ Colin Kerrigan/Delaware County Daily Times)

UPPER DARBY, Pa. (AP) — Call it a heifer hot pursuit.

The Delaware County Daily Times reports it took officers about an hour to round up a slaughter-bound cow that got loose in a borough adjoining Philadelphia.

Upper Darby police Superintendent Michael Chitwood says the cow was reported loose Saturday night. He says his officers pursued it in their cruisers and eventually cornered it in an alley by blocking it in.

During its dash to freedom the cow ran into a car, causing minor damage.

An employee for the butcher soon arrived and lassoed the creature.

Camel leads to animal cruelty arrests

Reports of a camel on a property in eastern Spokane County led to the recent arrest of a mother and daughter duo already charged with animal cruelty.

The camel belonged to a neighbor, but animal control officers say Kelly J. Covey, 49, had two dogs in her camper - a violation of a court order. The restriction has been in place since a Jan. 29 raid at the property, 6204 N. Idaho Road, that led to charges against Covey, her mother, Carol McMullen, 70, and Mullen's son, James W. McMullen.

In addition to the camel, SCRAPS investigators found cows and llamas at 6204 N. Idaho Road that also violated court orders.

Carol McMullen has previous convictions for animal cruelty; she was arrested again last week for violating her release conditions. Covey was booked into jail Friday.

The family faces several felony animal cruelty charges after 123 farm animals and pets were seized in January.

Officers found 78 dead animals on the property, located between State Line and Newman Lake.

Complex case came down to 15 cows

 

For some of the best legal minds in Washington state, a complicated Spokane divorce that spanned two continents and a bloody civil war came down to this: 15 cows.

The missing herd was part of several legal arguments before the Division III Court of Appeals as justices contemplated custody of two children. In the end their mother, who relocated to Spokane from Sudan, retained custody.

“This saga spans southern Sudan to Spokane, and features a civil war, refugees seeking to escape Africa and a failure of consideration because the war prevented payment of the remaining cows owed the bride’s father,” Judge Kevin Korsmo wrote in an opinion released last week. “Against this chaotic backdrop, the facts and law are often unclear and in some dispute.”

Read the rest of Tom Clouse's story here.

Mobster fugitive captured in rural Idaho

MARSING, Idaho (AP) — To his neighbors, he was Jay Shaw, the guy with the vaguely New York accent. He was known for fixing computers, buying everything with cash, raising cows and knowing how to handle a gun.

To the FBI, he was a New England mobster who vanished in 1994 after a botched attempt to whack his boss.

On Wednesday, the 42-year-old dark-haired man, dressed in a yellow jumpsuit and his hands cuffed behind his back, strolled into a courtroom in Boise, sat down at a table and spoke calmly to a judge.

“My name is Enrico M. Ponzo,” he said.

After the judge read a long list of charges against him, Ponzo replied: “Not guilty, your honor.”

Ponzo, 42, (pictured in 1994) appeared relaxed during his 40-minute court appearance, at times smiling at a handful of friends nearby and exchanging laughs with his attorney. He told the judge he is originally from Boston.

To the people who knew him in Marsing, a farming and ranching town southwest of Boise, the news about the man they called by his nickname “Jay” for the past decade pushed them to dig deep into their memories for signs of an elaborate hoax.

“It was probably all just fiction,” said rancher Bodie Clapier, 52, (pright) whose family owns about 1,000 acres and lived next door.

Authorities said Ponzo had been living in Marsing under the name Jeffrey Shaw, but they declined to say how the FBI discovered him. During his arrest Monday, agents seized 38 firearms, $15,000 and a 100-ounce bar of either gold or silver.

Ponzo's farm is pictured above.

Click the link below to read the rest of the story by Associated Press writer Jessie L. Bonner.

Death-bound cows on the lam in Michigan

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) — Police say 12 cows being driven to the slaughterhouse made a break for freedom when the truck that was transporting them overturned in west Michigan.

Police say the bovine escapees hoofed it over highway guardrails, forced traffic detours and caused at least one accident.

The 42-year-old truck driver suffered minor injuries in the accident in Kent County about 4 a.m. Wednesday.

All but five of the fugitive cattle had been rounded up by Thursday morning.

The animals from a farm in Farwell, Mich., had been destined to end their days at a slaughterhouse in Milwaukee, Wis.

Michigan State Police Trooper Joe Young said when all the animals are captured they will be euthanized.

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