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Sirens & Gavels

Posts tagged: Humane Society of the United States

Second bald eagle found shot to death

 A bald eagle was found shot to death in Riverside State Park last week - the second killed locally this month.

The Humane Society of the United States is offering a reward of up to $2,500 for tips that lead to the killer’s conviction. Apark ranger found the bird on South Bank Road.

The Humane Society already is offering a reward for tips that help convict the person who shot a bald eagle the weekend of March 6. That bird was found on the south bank of Long Lake off Long Lake Road.

Bald eagles are federally protected birds. Killing them is a federal crime that carries up to a year in prison and fines up to $100,000.

The Humane Society is offering the reward with the Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust.

Anyone with information is asked to call the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement at (509) 928-6050.

(The Associated Press photo at the right shows a bald eagle at Frentress Lake in the backwaters of the Mississippi River.)

Bald eagle shot to death near Long Lake

 A bald eagle was shot to death near Long Lake last weekend, and the Humane Society of the United States is offering a reward of up to $2,500 for tips that lead to the killer’s conviction.

The bird was found on the south bank of the Long Lake off Long Lake Road the weekend of March 6. Bald eagles are federally protected birds.

Killing them is a federal crime that carries up to a year in prison and fines up to $100,000.

In a prepared statement, Dan Paul, state director of the Humane Society, called the poaching “an affront to wildlife and the laws that protect these animals.”

The Humane Society is offering the reward with the Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust. Anyone with information is asked to call the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement at (509) 928-6050.

According to the Humane Society:

- Wildlife officials estimate that for every wild animal killed legally — tens of millions of animals per year — another is killed illegally.

- Every year, thousands of poachers are arrested nationwide; however, it is estimated that only 1 percent to 5 percent of poachers are caught.

Strychnine may have killed Spokane dogs

Washington State University veterinarians say a meatball found on a Spokane woman’s property contained strychnine - the same poison thought to have killed dogs in North Idaho last spring.

The Spokane woman’s dog died near Regal Street and the Palouse Highway last week after eating another meatball.

Two other dogs, Snoopy and Abby (pictured above, left and right), have died after eating similar meatballs found in the Moran Prairie neighborhood on Spokane’s South Hill.

One attack took place in the 3300 block of East 55th Avenue, killing two dogs owned by 21-year-old David Cheney and his family.

Then on Monday, a homeowner near 36th Avenue and Grand Boulevard found a suspicious meatball similar to those found Friday.

Test results for the additional meatballs are expected today or Thursday, said Nancy Hill, director of the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service.

Meanwhile, dog owners are urged to inspect their yards and keep their pets indoors, and the Humane Society of the United States is offering a $2,500 reward to catch the person responsible for poisoning dogs in Spokane.

Similar poisonings reported in North Idaho last March was never solved. Lisa Kauffman, Idaho state director for the Humane Society of the United States, said officials believe the incident may have stemmed from a family incident but were never able to prove it.

Past coverage:

Dog poisonings leave trail of questions, anguish

Sandpoint dogs poisoned by strychnine

Humane Society launches animal fighting hotline

 Know of an animal fighting operation in the Inland Northwest or elsewhere?

A national tip line launched recently by the Humane Society of the United States wants to hear from you.

The organization started the tip line after busting a multi-state dogfighting ring.

Read a story on the raid, which the Humane Society said was the largest dogfighting raid in the nation, here.

Dogfighting gained national attention when NFL star Michael Vick was convicted in 2007.

All 50 states now classify the crime as a felony. But less than two years ago, Idaho was one of two states that didn’t. The Idaho Legislature changed that last year in a story you can read here.

A dogfighting ring busted in Spokane Valley in April 2007 underscored the presence of the problem in the area.

The Human Society is offering rewards of up to $5,000 for tips that lead to convictions for dogfighting or cockfighting.

“Animal fighting is a cruel, criminal activity, and we plan to root it out in every dark corner where it festers,” Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO, said in a news release. “We encourage anyone with information about animal fighting crimes to call this tip line to help us put violators in jail and to put a stop to cruelty.”

The hotline’s number is 877-TIP-HSUS (847-4787).

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