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Spin Control

Archive for June 29, 2013

Sunday spin: Lots to learn from six months of session

There are things one learns after 153 days watching the Legislature.

Well, technically not 153 days of watching, because there were big stretches of time in the 105-day regular session, the 30-day first special session and the 18-day second special session that there really was no Legislature to watch. Most of the honorables were gone home and the few leaders and budget negotiators were squirreled away from the prying eyes of the public. But even when they are gone, there were lessons to be learned. Such as:

To read the list, or to comment, click here to continue inside the blog.

WA Lege: That’s all, folks

OLYMPIA – After 153 days, the Washington Legislature decided Saturday it had had enough, even though Gov. Jay Inslee wanted it to do more.

In quick succession, the House and Senate passed a $3.6 billion spending plan for large capital construction projects with large majorities from both parties. In less than an hour, legislators adjourned their second special session and headed home.

A short time earlier, the Senate had killed a $10 billion plan for road and bridge projects, which the House passed and Inslee supported. The predominantly Republican majority coalition, which held a tight rein on its members the entire year, defeated a parliamentary measure that could have shocked it back to life. . . 

To read the rest of this post, and a list of local construction projects in the Capital Budget, go inside the blog

 

Capital budget passes. Lege to adjourn

OLYMPIA — The Legislature passed a $3.6 billion capital projects budget this evening as its last action of its protracted session.

In quick succession, the House and Senate both passed the list of projects and gave the state the authority to sell bonds to build them.

With a plan to spend an extra $10 billion on transportation projects dead, the capital budget was the final thing on the Legislature's plate and adjournment is expected soon.

Quite moment on Senate floor

OLYMPIA — Sen. Maralyn Chase, D-Shoreline, holds Henry Schlicher while his father, Sen. Nathan Schlicher, D-Gig Harbor, handles a motion on the Senate floor. The extended special session prompted Schlicher to bring his son to the Legislature Saturday.

Transpo package dead

OLYMPIA — That sound you heard was the last gasp death rattle of a $10 billion plan to raise gasoline taxes to pay for new road projects, fix existing roads and bridges and boost mass transit.

Despite a plea from Gov. Jay INslee earlier in the day to pass the package, which was declare dead but then moved to life support late Friday night, the coalition that controls the Senate said there were too many questions about the list of projects, the cost of doing them without further reforms in the state Transportation Department or rules for building roads and bridges.

Senate Democrats tried to force the bill onto the floor through a parliamentary maneuver. Inslee had predicted if the predominately Republican coalition would allow a vote, it could pass.

Before the vote on the maneuver, technically known as a motion to move to the Ninth Order, Senate Republican Leader Mark Schoesler, asked to reject it as a “procedural vote.” In case anyone missed his point, Schoesler used the word procedural four times. The coalition has always held its 25-24 margin on procedural votes.

It did this time, too. The motion failed 26-21.

Legislature expects to adjourn later today.

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About this blog

Jim Camden is a veteran political reporter for The Spokesman-Review.


Jonathan Brunt is an enterprise reporter for The Spokesman-Review.


Kip Hill is a general assignments reporter for The Spokesman-Review.

Nick Deshais covers Spokane City Hall for The Spokesman-Review.

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