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Spin Control

Posts tagged: Flags

State lowers flags to half-staff

The World War II Memorial on the Capitol Campus today.

In case you're wondering: Washington state buildings have their flags at half-staff today.

It's in honor of Pearl Harbor Day.

Flag designer would be happy to see flag flying again

A few weeks ago I wrote a story about the reemergence of the City of Spokane's flag.

I heard soon after from the flag designer's son, who shed more light on the flag.

Here is his note:

I'm Lloyd Carlson's son, and it was a real treat to see the flag again after all these years. The history of the flag is actually somewhat more complex (perhaps you knew this but didn't have space) as the “Children of the Sun” logo was done by dad as the official seal of the City of Spokane in the 1960s — 1964-65 as I recall. I have the original artwork, along with the original Expo '74 logo master art in my collection of his designs.

The flag combined the city seal with the white, green and blue motif that had been made famous by the Expo “Mobius strip” logo. The STA (Spokane Transit Authority) adopted the same colors a bit later, which I believe are still in use. When I visit Spokane I see examples of logos he did half a century ago, still in use– not a bad legacy.

Dad was born in Spokane and lived there until 1986, when my parents moved to Portland to be near their grandchildren. In his retirement, he painted as a hobby, but still did the occasional logo design to keep his hand in. He passed away in July of 2009 at the age of 90. I know he would be so very pleased that the City of Spokane flag was flying again.

Best regards,

Steven B. Carlson

(Attached to this blog post of a letter Carlson wrote to Mayor Jack Geraghty about the logo he designed for Expo '74. Here is a link to photos of all three of the city's official flags, which were adopted in 1912, 1958 and Carlson's in 1975.)


Documents:

State flags to be lowered Monday

OLYMPIA — State flags will be at half-staff Monday to  honor Pfc. James L. Miller of Yakima, a member of the 5th Stryker Brigade Combat Team killed in Afghanistan Monday.

Gov. Chris Gregoire issued the order this morning for lowering the flags. Miller, 21, died of injuries inflicted by a roadside bomb.

State flags lowered

Washington state lowered flags to half staff today in honor of Pvt. Aaron Fairbairn, a 21-year-old soldier from Aberdeen who was killed in Action in Afghanistan on July 4.

Gov. Chris Gregoire issued the order early Thursday morning. The flags will stay at half staff on state buildings through sunset today, or until Friday morning if the flags stay outside round the clock.

WA flags ordered to half staff

Gov. Chris Gregoire ordered flags on state buildings lowered to half staff Wednesday in honor of 1st Lt. Brian Bradshaw of Steilacoom.

Bradshaw, 24, died June 25 in Kheyl, Afghanistan, from injuries suffered when an improvised explosive device was detonated.

One other flag note

The flag flying below the Stars and Stripes on the Spokane County Courthouse is the official Prisoner of War/Missing In Action flag.

It has a black field with a white circle in the middle, which has a profile of a head in silhouette. The county flies it to honor missing military personnel from here and around the country.

 Some county staff members noted recently that people have called recently to ask why the county was flying a pirate flag. So if you thought that was the Jolly Roger flying from the courthouse tower, you can be forgiven if you just rented Pirates of the Caribbean on DVD or had your property taxes jacked up.

But you probably still should get your eyes checked.

At half staff

In case you’re wondering:

May 15 is Peace Officers Memorial Day. Because of this, flags on government buildings — and some commercial and private buildings with flagpoles — lowered to half staff.

And even though Monday was the day that local officials marked the loss of life among public safety employees, that was at the beginning of the memorial week. This is the day.

General misstated the debate

While asking retired Gen. Barry McCaffrey about the president’s plan to draw down the troops in Iraq, Matt Lauer segued Friday morning into another military question du jour, the lifting of the ban on photographing the coffins of returning casualties.

For those not following closely at home, the Pentagon has long banned pictures and videos of the flag-draped coffins coming off the planes at Dover Air Force Base, which is, for most fallen service members, their first American stop on the final journey home. A cynical person might say that the Pentagon, or the previous Administration, didn’t want the public to be reminded of the true cost of the war. The official response, however, was always that it was to preserve the dignity of the soldiers and the privacy of the family.

McCaffrey’s answer pretty much blew the official answer out of the water, as well as misstated the whole debate.

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About this blog

Jim Camden is a veteran political reporter for The Spokesman-Review.


Jonathan Brunt is an enterprise reporter for The Spokesman-Review.


Kip Hill is a general assignments reporter for The Spokesman-Review.

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