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Spin Control

Posts tagged: marijuana bans

Stick a fork in the medical pot bills

OLYMPIA —Washington's two marijuana systems — an older one for medical patients and a new one for “recreational use” by adults —may remain separate at least for another year.

Legislators involved in negotiations over proposals to merge the two as Washington gets its new legal recreational marijuana system off the ground agreed there was little chance bills would pass in the waning hours of the session.

Rep. Cary Condotta, R-East Wenatchee, said House Republicans wanted a portion of the tax money to be collected from the newly licensed marijuana growers, processors and retail stores to go to local governments. Initiative 502, which voters approved in 2012, sends all marijuana tax revenue to the state. Without that change, the main proposal to merge the two systems had “no hope, no how,” he said.

But Condotta held out hope that a separate bill calling for a group to study ways to improve and merge the two marijuana system would pass before the Legislature adjourned.

Cities and counties around the state have imposed moratoriums on allowing new medical marijuana businesses within their borders, but Condotta said those objections would disappear if they were promised revenue to help pay for the extra law enforcement many local officials think will be needed when the businesses open.

Rep. Eileen Cody, D-West Seattle, said the proposed change to send some tax money to local governments didn't have the votes to pass and was “95 percent dead.” The study bill wasn't going to pass without the larger bill dealing with the merger, she said, but Gov. Jay Inslee could call for a study through an executive order.

Ezra Eickmeyer of the Washington Cannabis Association, a group that represents medical marijuana patients, accused local jurisdictions of “holding the initiative hostage” for tax money. But merging the two systems and closing the current medical marijuana dispensaries without some agreement to drop the moratoriums and allow recreational stores all over the state meant patients would have trouble getting the medical version of the drug.

Without controls on the growing number of medical marijuana growers and dispensaries, Cody said the state could have trouble with the federal government, which still considers the drug illegal for all uses. “The feds may come in and start closing some of them down,” she said.

WA Lege Day 24: Carrot, stick for pot businesses get OK

OLYMPIA — A House panel approved what it described as both a carrot and a stick for local governments that are reluctant to approve new marijuana businesses that have been licensed by the state.

In a 9-0 vote, the Government Accountability and Oversight Committee approved a proposal that would send some of the tax money collected from recreational marijuana businesses back to the city or county where the business is licensed. It also adds language to state law that says state law pre-empts local ordinances on recreational marijuana.

A few cities have approved complete bans on recreational marijuana businesses, and dozens  more have passed moratoria on approving them while certain issues are studied. That could set up a scenario where the drug can be purchased legally at state regulated stores by adults in one community, but onlly on the black marked in a neighboring community, Committee Chairman Chris Hurst, D-Enumclaw, said.

“Initiative 502 won't work unless it works everywhere,” said Hurst, referring to the ballot measure that legalized recreational marijuana for adults in 2012. “The voters have spoken…This is about making it work.”

It's likely not the last change the law will need, he added. The bill now heads for the House Finance Committee because of changes in the way taxes are distributed. If it is approved there, it goes to the full House.

Later today, the Senate Commerce and Labor Committee holds hearings on a pair of bills that try to merge the recreational marijuana system with the medical marijuana system which was set up by a different initiative in 1998. 

 

Sunday Spin: Marijuana a racist slur? No dude, it’s not

With more than 100 bills addressing marijuana this session, it may be no surprise the silliest thing said so far has involved this topic.

Granted, we’re only a third of the way through the session, and a huge amount of silliness may lie ahead. But it will be hard for anyone to top a point being raised with great conviction – albeit not much thought – at several recent hearings on marijuana bills:

“Marijuana is a racial slur.”

Because of this, some hearing witnesses say, the state should stop using the word, strike it from the law books, and replace it with “cannabis.”

Dude, please. . .

To read the rest of this item, or to comment, continue inside the blog.

Carrot or stick to fight pot business bans?

OLYMPIA – Legislators are trying to decide whether to offer a carrot or use a stick against local governments that don’t want to let recreational marijuana businesses set up shop inside their borders.

The carrot: Offering up some of the taxes those businesses will be required to pay the state as the drug moves from harvest to sale.

The stick: A flat out ban on interfering with pot businesses that get state licenses.

Not surprisingly, cities and counties would rather have the cash. But they’re reluctant to promise they'd issue licenses even then. . .

To read the rest of this item, or to comment, continue inside the blog.

 

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About this blog

Jim Camden is a veteran political reporter for The Spokesman-Review.


Jonathan Brunt is an enterprise reporter for The Spokesman-Review.


Kip Hill is a general assignments reporter for The Spokesman-Review.

Nick Deshais covers Spokane City Hall for The Spokesman-Review.

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