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Posts tagged: minimum wage

Supreme Court hears $15 minimum wage case

OLYMPIA — The state's first $15 minimum wage should extend to SeaTac Airport because the higher wages don't  interfere with airport operations, attorneys for the City of Seatac told the state Supreme Court today. 

But an attorney for the airport argued the city has no authority to enforce the law approved at the ballot box by Seatac residents because the airport is governed by a separate entity, the Port of Seattle. . . 

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State Dems, in Spokane, call for rise in minimum wage

The Washington State Democratic Party on Saturday approved an 18-point party platform that will help guide the party for the next two years.

The party met for its biennial convention at the Red Lion Hotel at the Park in downtown Spokane.

Jaxon Ravens, the state party chairman, said delegates approved all 18 planks proposed by the party’s platform committee “with minor amendments.”

Among items in the platform is a call to raise the minimum wage. But it isn’t as specific as what was adopted by the Seattle City Council earlier this month: a phased-in rise of the minimum wage to $15.

The state party’s minimum wage position is: “We support an incremental increase in the state and federal minimum wage, with a living wage as the goal.”

Inslee: Minimum wage prospects not good in Lege

OLYMPIA — Gov. Jay Inslee said he wants a public conversation about raising the state's minimum wage but acknowledged today the chance an increase will pass the 2014 Legislature are not good.

“I can't be optimistic it's going to pass the state Senate this year,” he said during a telephone press conference from Washington, D.C., where he's attending the National Governors Conference. . . 

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Min wage wars: Up for all or down for teens?

OLYMPIA – The state’s minimum wage would go up for some workers and down for others under proposals moving through the Legislature this week.

It would go up to $12 an hour by 2017 for all hourly workers under a proposal approved Wednesday by the Democratic-controlled House Labor and Work Force Development Committee. It would be at least $15 an hour for school employees under a separate proposal the committee passed.

It would go down to as low as $7.25 an hour for teen-agers under a proposal approved by the Republican-controlled Senate Commerce and Labor Committee. . . 

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Inslee: Do more hard things. GOP: Be more specific.

OLYMPIAWashington should raise its minimum wage, spend more on schools and highways, raise teacher salaries and do something about climate change, Gov. Jay Inslee said Tuesday.

“We have done hard things. And we can do more,” the Democratic governor told a joint legislative session in his annual state of the state address.

Legislative Republicans and a Democrat who joined them to form the Senates ruling coalition were quick to criticize the speech as long on ideas but short on specifics. . . 

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Today’s fun video: On fast-food wages

 

If you ever worked at a fast-food restaurant, you may get an even bigger laugh than  normal out of The Daily Show's take on the back and forth over proposals to raise the minimum wage for workers in that industry.

John Oliver's bit goes so long that it is broken into three parts on the web site, and this is the middle part that takes on the talking head TV gasbags talking about how minimum wage worker doesn't need raises because if he or she has any gumption, he or she will get better wages at better jobs, just like they did.

 To see the whole thing, click here.

On minimum wages and maximum salaries

OLYMPIA – While a House committee considered plans Tuesday to cut wages for some of the state's lowest-paid private workers, a Senate committee tried to emphasize the state doesn’t pay the salaries of its highest-paid public workers.

The House Labor Committee considered five different changes to the state's minimum wage law, which rises with inflation because of a 1998 ballot initiative and is now among the highest in the nation.
It’s so high that it hurts employment, training opportunities and profits, business groups told the committee. Cut the minimum wage and those workers will have less to spend in the economy, opponents of the bills said.

The Senate Higher Education Committee, meanwhile, aired out a bill that would prohibit by statute something that currently doesn't happen anyway: using state tax money to pay the salaries of coaches and other intercollegiate sports expenses at Washington State University and University of Washington.

“Everywhere I go, people are saying ‘I can’t believe the highest paid people for the state of Washington are football coaches,’ ” said Sen. Mary Margaret Haugen, D-Camano Island. They’re often skeptical when she tells them that’s not state money; her bill would give current practice of using outside revenue to pay for intercollegiate expenses “the force of law.”…

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About this blog

Jim Camden is a veteran political reporter for The Spokesman-Review.


Jonathan Brunt is an enterprise reporter for The Spokesman-Review.


Kip Hill is a general assignments reporter for The Spokesman-Review.

Nick Deshais covers Spokane City Hall for The Spokesman-Review.

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