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Posts tagged: Bing Crosby Theater

A feathered escape artist flees the Comedy Pet Theater

High drama, involving green feathers, took place at intermission on the street outside of the Popovich Comedy Pet Theater performance last week at the Bing Crosby Theater.

Michael Smith, who manages the Bing, said his first inkling came when he looked out the window of the lobby and saw an alarming sight.

“I saw the people from the show running down the street with a ladder,” said Smith.

Turns out, the show's big green parrot had flown the coop during intermission, swooped through the stage door, and winged its way across Lincoln Street. It was perched on the ledge of a fourth floor window at the Davenport Hotel.

The show's parrot wranglers set the ladder up on the sidewalk and tried to lure the parrot down. The parrot was stubborn and refused to budge.

The ladder and general hubbub attracted the attention of the Davenport's security people. They brought the frantic Popovich people into the hotel and took them up to the fourth floor room. They opened the window and talked the parrot off the ledge and into the room.

Those of us in the audience had no idea what was going on — although I wondered why intermission went on so long.

The show resumed, with the usual retinue of 12 cats, 10 dogs, three geese — and one adventuresome parrot.

Bing Film Series begins with ‘Some Like It Hot’

The fall film series at the Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague, has been set:

  • Sept. 27, “Some Like It Hot,” the great 1959 Billy Wilder classic with Marilyn Monroe, Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis.
  • Oct. 11, “Giant,” the 1956 James Dean-Elizabeth Taylor epic.
  • Oct. 25, “Charade,” the ultimate '60s caper thriller, with Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn.
  • Oct. 29, the Halloween Show featuring “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” (the 1949 version narrated by Bing Crosby), “Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy” and the 1978 Jamie Lee Curtis screamfest, “Halloween.”

All shows are at 7 p.m. except the Halloween Show, which starts at 6 p.m.

This beautifully restored 1915 movie house is a great place to see these classic films. The series is also a great bargain. It's free.

However, a $5 donation is suggested, with proceeds going to the Advocates for the Bing Crosby Theater, which has been instrumental in supporting this great old theater.

Meryl Streep’s son to open at Bing, Panida

Henry Wolfe, an LA singer-songwriter, has been added as the opening act for April Smith & The Great Picture Show at the Panida Theatre in Sandpoint on Oct. 6 and at the Bing Crosby Theater in Spokane on Oct. 7.

Wolfe has a well-received album of originals, “Linda Vista,” out right now and he has been making a splash in LA.

He also happens to be the son of Meryl Streep, which he ruefully admits can be a little “overshadowing.”

Tickets for both shows are on sale through TicketsWest.

Cokie’s coming to the Bing

Cokie Roberts, the great political reporter for NPR, has just been booked in to the Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague, for a talk on Oct. 1, 8 p.m.

Spokane Public Radio is sponsoring her appearance. Roberts will talk about the issues roiling the other Washington, including healthcare, the debt, the economy and whatever new national crisis has reared its head by Oct. 1.

Roberts comes by her political acumen honestly. She's the daughter of two famous Congress members, her father Hale Boggs and her mother Lindy Boggs.

A lot of people, and I am one, rely on her for a level-headed view of what's happening in politics.

Tickets will be $40 (it's a Spokane Public Radio fundraiser), on sale Aug. 19 through Ticketswest.

Bing books a funky Duke — George, that is

George Duke, the funky keyboard master associated with Frank Zappa, Michael Jackson and Miles Davis, has been booked into the Bing Crosby Theater for a show on Aug. 11.

Duke toured with the Mothers of Invention in the 1960s, played on Jackson's “Off the Wall” album, and produced Miles Davis' “Tutu” album.

Duke will be accompanied by a couple of other big names: David Sanborn and Marcus Miller.

Tickets are $41.50, on sale Thursday here.

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