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Tuesday, January 22, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Books

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American Life in Poetry: ‘Bakery of Lies’

I’ve had my eye on Americans’ obsessions for more than 70 years and I can’t remember a time when public lying got as much attention as it does today. Attention yes, but consequences, no.

A&E >  Books

American Life in Poetry: ‘Exit Glacier’ by Peggy Shumaker

The glaciers that flattened my part of the world made their exit eons ago, but in Alaska, where Peggy Shumaker lives and writes, they’re just now beginning to turn back. Only deep in a Nebraska snowbank can you shovel your way into the blue she describes at the end of this poem, from her new and selected poems,
A&E >  Books

Review: ‘A Spark of Light,’ by Jodi Picoult

Jodi Picoult has tackled, as she once ticked off for an interviewer, “neonaticide, the death penalty, mercy killing, stem cell research, the right to die, gay rights” in her long career. What could be left? For her 27th novel, the controversy du jour is abortion – specifically, a shooting at a family planning clinic in Jackson, Mississippi, and how lives inside the building and out are touched over the course of one long day. This being Picoult, of course, there is a gimmick. She tells “A Spark of Light” backward; beginning at 5 p.m., each chapter jumps back an hour until it’s breakfast time.
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American Life in Poetry: ‘Growing Apples’

Nancy Miller Gomez lives in California and directs writing workshops for incarcerated men and women. This poem gives us a glimpse of innocent delight inside those walls. It’s from her chapbook, “Punishment,” from Rattle.
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Everything is copy: Finding harder truths along the harder route

During the mediation, the officer said that while he had a slightly different memory of the exchange, his hasty words didn’t reflect what he’d meant, didn’t represent him. He wanted to tell me who he was: a father, an athlete, a coach, a 20-year member of the force, the product of an inter-racial family, a believer in justice and an admirer of Martin Luther King Jr., whose words about the content of one’s character he often re-read.
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Reading the Northwest: Book club authors share their 2018 favorites

The Spokesman-Review launched Northwest Passages a year ago as a book club and community forum with a mission to get people reading – and talking. If anything, we underestimated the passion of our readers, as crowds packed venues to hear writers including Craig Johnson, creator of the Longmire mysteries; Jess Walter, the best-selling Spokane novelist; and Tara Westover, author of a celebrated memoir about growing up off the grid in Idaho.
A&E >  Books

Robert Caro reflects on his career in upcoming book

NEW YORK – Robert Caro’s next book isn’t his fifth and final volume on Lyndon Johnson or like anything he has done before. “Working: Researching, Interviewing, Writing,” to be published by Alfred A. Knopf in April, combines personal reflections and professional guidance as Caro looks back on his singular history as a writer and reporter. The book includes previous lectures and interviews, but also new material. In the introduction, the 83-year-old Caro writes that the 240-page “Working” is not a “full-length memoir,” which he still hopes to write, but a more informal gathering of “thoughts” and “experiences” behind such prize-winning books as his Johnson biography “Master of the Senate” and his classic book on municipal builder Robert Moses, “The Power Broker.”