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Wells Fargo to pay $110 million to settle fake account suit

UPDATED: TUESDAY, MARCH 28, 2017, 7:35 P.M.

Wells Fargo has agreed to pay $110 million to settle a class-action lawsuit over up to 2 million accounts its employees opened for customers without getting their permission, the bank announced Tuesday.

A look at how Trump’s moves on coal will affect the industry

UPDATED: TUESDAY, MARCH 28, 2017, 7:30 P.M.

A haul truck carries coal near Decker, Mont. President Trump's latest move to support coal mining is unlikely to turn around the industry's prospects immediately. Experts say the biggest problem faced by the mining industry today isn't a coal shortage of coal or even the prospect of climate change regulations, but an abundance of cheap natural gas. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File) ORG XMIT: FX202 (Matthew Brown / AP)
Experts say coal’s biggest problem isn’t a shortage of the fuel to dig or even climate change regulations but cheap and abundant natural gas. Gas prices dropped as advances in drilling such as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, greatly increased the amount of gas on the market. For many utilities, that’s made gas a more attractive fuel than coal.

Selling water: Coke, Pepsi look to make water rain money

UPDATED: TUESDAY, MARCH 28, 2017, 7:30 P.M.

In this Thursday, March 16, 2017, photo, bottles of Lifewtr and Smartwater are displayed in Philadelphia. As bottled water surges in popularity, Coke, Pepsi and other companies are  expanding variations of what comes out of the tap. (Matt Rourke / Associated Press)
As bottled water surges in popularity, Coke, Pepsi and other companies are using celebrity endorsements, stylish packaging and fancy filtration processes like “reverse osmosis” to sell people on expanding variations of what comes out of the tap. They’re also adding flourishes like bubbles, flavors or sweeteners that can blur the lines between what is water and what is soda.

Amazon tests grocery pickup service in Seattle

TUESDAY, MARCH 28, 2017, 9:28 A.M.

This Sept. 6, 2012, file photo, shows the Amazon logo in Santa Monica, Calif. Amazon is continuing to delve into new ways of letting people shop, this time with a grocery pickup service in Seattle called AmazonFresh Pickup. (Reed Saxon / Associated Press)
Amazon is testing a grocery pickup service in Seattle. The AmazonFresh Pickup service is currently open only to Amazon employees. Eventually, members of Amazon’s $99-a-year Prime loyalty program will be able to order groceries online and drive to a pickup location, where crews will deliver items to the car.

U.S. stock indexes veer higher as consumer confidence gains

TUESDAY, MARCH 28, 2017, 8:28 A.M.

This July 16, 2013, file photo, shows a Wall Street street sign outside the New York Stock Exchange. U.S. stock indexes moved slightly higher in morning trading Tuesday as investors weighed the latest batch of company earnings and economic news. (Mark Lennihan / Associated Press)
U.S. stock indexes moved slightly higher in morning trading Tuesday as investors weighed the latest batch of company earnings and economic news. New data showed strong gains in consumer confidence and U.S. home prices. Banks and other financial stocks led the way higher, while phone company stocks were down the most.

Northwest wheat prices

TUESDAY, MARCH 28, 2017

Portland exporter bids for wheat delivered to the Northwest coast in unit trains or barges. Prices in dollars per bushel.

Another congressional clash looms over coal miners’ health benefits

MONDAY, MARCH 27, 2017, 8:26 P.M.

Lawmakers representing coal-producing states are using every political device they can – including threatening to trigger a partial government shutdown to holding up a White House nominee – to prevent health care benefits for more than 22,000 retired miners from expiring at the end of April.

Wells Fargo rolls out card-free access at all of its ATMs

MONDAY, MARCH 27, 2017, 8:25 P.M.

Starting on Monday, Wells Fargo will be the first major U.S. bank to offer a card-free option at all of its ATMs. The bank’s customers will be able to use their smartphones to access any of the bank’s 13,000 ATMs.

‘Bathroom bill’ to cost North Carolina $3.76 bill, study shows

UPDATED: MONDAY, MARCH 27, 2017, 8:27 P.M.

A sign outside a restroom at 21c Museum Hotel in Durham, N.C. The Associated Press has determined that North Carolina's law limiting LGBT protections will cost the state more than $3 billion in lost business over a dozen years. (Gerry Broome / Associated Press)
Despite Republican assurances that North Carolina’s “bathroom bill” isn’t hurting the economy, the law limiting LGBT protections will cost the state more than $3.76 billion in lost business over a dozen years, according to an Associated Press analysis.

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