u 2011 Washington General Election

Spokane Mayor, City of Spokane

About this race

This race pits incumbent Mayor Mary Verner against challenger David Condon, a former congressional aide. Verner was the runaway favorite in the five-way August primary, capturing an unprecedented 60 percent of all primary ballots cast. Condon secured his spot as November challenger with a distant second place finish in the primary, capturing barely half as many votes.

Last updated: Nov. 14, 4:59 p.m. Election results

CandidateVotesPct
David Condon 30,768 52.36%
Mary Verner 27,991 47.64%

* Race percentages are calculated with data from the Secretary of State's Office, which omits write-in votes from its calculations when there are too few to affect the outcome. The Spokane County Auditor's Office may have slightly different percentages than are reflected here because its figures include any write-in votes.

Related coverage

Panel will review police policies, procedures

To understand why the Spokane Police Department’s use-of-force training is under a microscope, consider this disconnect: Although the state’s top police trainer concluded that the fatal 2006 confrontation with unarmed janitor Otto Zehm was indefensible, the department’s own instructors and the city’s legal advisers have insisted that Spokane police officers were justified and handled the encounter appropriately. Here is how Spokane police Officer Terry Preuninger, a department training instructor, defended Officer Karl F. Thompson Jr.’s decision to beat and shock the retreating Zehm: “If the officer believes that they were in danger, then that use of force would be authorized,” Preuninger told a federal jury in October, adding that there doesn’t have to be a “factual basis” for the officer’s fear of harm. Read more

Council to tackle firefighter contract

Spokane city leaders are readying for a showdown with the Spokane Firefighters Union over a three-year contract negotiated between the firefighters and former Mayor Mary Verner in the final days of her administration. But challenging the deal could prove risky for the City Council and force the city to give the union a more generous contract than the one now before them. Read more

Condon to keep salary at $100K for 2012

Spokane Mayor David Condon will hold his salary at $100,000 this year as promised, despite the recent controversy over his predecessor’s pay. But he said he will review his options and the city’s legal opinions and may take more next year. Read more

Condon gala aids Chase foundation

Addressing the crowd at his inaugural ball, Spokane Mayor David Condon said he will strive to be like the popular mayor who led the city when he was a boy, Jim Chase. More than 400 people attended Condon’s $75-a-plate “Our Town Gala” on Saturday night at the Lincoln Center in north Spokane. Proceeds will go to the Chase Youth Foundation, the financial arm of the youth commission that Chase fought to create when he was mayor in the 1980s. Read more

Condon’s ball raises more than $20,000 for Chase Youth Foundation

Addressing the crowd at his inaugural ball, Spokane Mayor David Condon said he will strive to be like Jim Chase…

Read more

Body cameras considered for Spokane police officers

Spokane’s elected leaders are ready to push for the use of body cameras on police officers to record their interactions with the public. The Spokane City Council on Feb. 6 will vote on a resolution outlining its goals for reforming the Spokane Police Department in the aftermath of an officer being convicted of violating the civil rights of a Spokane man who died in police custody. Read more

Ex-chief justice joins police use of force panel

A recently retired state Supreme Court justice has agreed to serve on a city commission examining how the Spokane Police Department uses force. The membership of the city’s Use of Force Commission, which was created last year to review the city’s handling of the police confrontation that resulted in the death of Otto Zehm in 2006, was announced by City Council President Ben Stuckart at Monday’s council meeting. The council is set to confirm the membership next week. Read more

How to calculate Verner’s (or most other city workers’) pension

Former Mayor Mary Verner's salary and pension request, which was denied by the city, has raised questions from several…

Read more

Verner’s defense of pay request cruelest cut

Any idea what an “average middle-class family’s income in the city of Spokane” is? If you guessed $100,000, you’re way, way off. Read more

Doug Clark: Mary, Mary, you’ve become quite contrary

Listen up, gang. I’m looking for volunteers to make cookies, cupcakes and zucchini bread for our first (and hopefully last) Mary Verner Bake Sale. We need to raise $140,000. That’s a lot of scratch, I know. Read more

Verner pay request denied

Former Mayor Mary Verner says she will not receive the $140,000 in back pay she requested in her final days in office. Verner told KHQ-TV that she received a “determination letter” from the city stating it had ruled against her request. Read more

Condon team big on ideas – and jargon

If you were hoping that Mayor David Condon would “manage” the city more effectively, take heart. His transition team’s report this week was spectacularly managerial: It was full to the brim of organizational jargon and cliché. Read more

Verner preceded her exit with request for back pay

In her final days as Spokane’s mayor, Mary Verner decided that she wanted a raise. After voluntarily capping her annual pay at about $100,000 for four years – and pledging to do the same in a second term if re-elected – Verner changed her mind after losing the November election and issued a formal request Dec. 29 for about $140,000 in uncollected back pay from the final two years of her term. If that wasn’t possible, Verner requested that her retirement benefits be calculated as if she had earned the full mayoral salary of about $170,000 a year. Read more

Verner, fire union reached deal

Former Spokane Mayor Mary Verner and the leadership of the city’s fire union tentatively agreed to a new contract in the final days of Verner’s term. But the deal still needs approval of the union’s membership and the new City Council. Mayor David Condon will be able to make a recommendation to the council, but he can’t otherwise stop the deal. Read more

Verner agreed to new fire contract, but new council will have final say

Former Mayor Mary Verner and the leadership of the city's fire union tentatively agreed to a new contract in…

Read more

Mayor, officials endorse Chase commission plan

Spokane’s youth programs would remain independent from other nonprofit groups under a new plan that has support from Mayor David Condon. Former Mayor Mary Verner, whose 2012 budget eliminated the city’s Youth Department, originally proposed contracting with the YMCA or other nonprofit groups to oversee youth activities and the Chase Youth Commission. But after opposition emerged from the commission, she backed a plan crafted by General Administration Director Dorothy Webster to give the money and oversight responsibilities to the commission and its partner organization, the Chase Youth Foundation. Read more

Condon will host inaugural ball to benefit Chase Youth Foundation

Spokane Mayor David Condon will host a formal dinner and dance on Jan. 28 to celebrate the start of his…

Read more

Doug Clark: Hopefully, Condon won’t stop the insanity

First real day on the job and Mayor David Condon makes noises about fulfilling his campaign promise to restore the public’s faith in the Spokane Police Department. Folks, I’m worried. Read more

Interim chief has spent career with Spokane Police Department

Scott Stephens grew up in Spokane and graduated from Gonzaga Preparatory School in 1979. He attended Eastern Washington University but never earned a degree. He was recently accepted to the University of Oklahoma and plans to earn his degree online. Stephens has been in law enforcement for 26 years, all of which have been spent with the Spokane Police Department. He started as an officer, was promoted to 1st Class patrolman, then spent six years as a sergeant before he was promoted to lieutenant. He was a lieutenant for 12 years, which included time overseeing the major crimes unit. He served as major for two years and was appointed acting assistant police chief in October when former Assistant Chief Jim Nicks took medical leave. He has experience as commander of investigations and in administration and patrol bureaus. Read more

Mayor vows to restore confidence in police

A 26-year veteran of the Spokane Police Department will lead the troubled agency, at least for the next few months. On his first business day as Spokane’s mayor, David Condon appointed Maj. Scott Stephens interim police chief and announced plans to review the department’s use-of-force policies and training. Read more