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Allen pulls on a compression sock after a visit. He was being fitted with a new socket after a revision surgery to fix problems with his stump. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)

Dr. Tim Chestnut brings personal experience to his work helping amputees

Dr. Tim Chestnut has seen both sides of health care for amputees, as a patient following a 2002 accident and subsequent 2006 amputation, and as a physician who now does medical evaluations for amputees and writes reports meeting insurance requirements so that people can receive advanced prosthetics for work or recreation. He also teaches first- and second-year students for University of Washington School of Medicine on the Gonzaga University campus.

Mariah McKay is part of a group that has spent about a year planning a 34-unit “village” in the Perry District to have a mix of private living units and a lot of common spaces geared toward neighbors often interacting. About 17 people so far are involved in an LLC purchasing a 3-acre site for the neighborhood, to be designed for people in their 20s to those in their 80s. (Dan Pelle / The Spokesman-Review)

Community by design: Spokane Cohousing seeks to build a village in the Perry District

The Spokane Cohousing group has spent about a year planning a 34-unit development in the Perry District that would have a mix of private living units and common spaces. About 17 people so far are involved in an LLC purchasing property for the neighborhood, to be designed for a range of ages among residents, from kids to people in their 80s. Members regularly meet to decide on designs for construction planned to begin next year, and for a move-in date by April 2020.
Dr. David Ward talks with his patient, Cole Boden, 16, about importance of a healthy diet and exercise during a visit, Friday, Feb. 22, 2018, in Spokane, Wash. (Dan Pelle / The Spokesman-Review)

Live long, live well: Do’s and don’ts to boost your health

We talked to primary care and public health doctors in Spokane and looked at recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, Choosing Wisely and other consumer-focused health care sites to come up with a list of common places money can be wasted in health care – and some changes you can make if you’re interested in being healthy while getting the most bang for your buck.

In the Garden: Gardening brings joy all year

Throughout this winter, I’ve been feeling a deep sense of gratitude for the delicious food last year’s garden has given us. We were able to line our pantry with jars of jam, applesauce, tomato sauce and salsa, cucumber relish and cherries for pies. In the basement, we stored butternut squash, onions, garlic and the last of the tomatoes for use in yummy dishes.
The Martin Luther King Jr. memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., features quotes from King on love and tolerance. (Ellen Creager / Tribune News Service)

Discover the historyof civil rights movement

Embark on a journey of discovery and understanding when you and your family visit the destinations and landmarks that play a part in the American civil rights story.

The Slice: Waiting to be called in for a consult

It’s probably not the same as actually having a medical degree. But if you spend enough time in doctors’ waiting rooms, you start to imagine that you possess skills as a diagnostician. And this is not an unusual development in Spokane, where cooling your heels in medical waiting rooms is one of the leading local pastimes for a certain demographic.
Lab technologist Sharda Modi tests a patient's swab for a flu infection at Upson Regional Medical Center on Feb. 9, 2018 in Thomaston, Ga. U.S. health officials on Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, said fewer visits to the doctor last week – 1 out of 16 – were for fever, cough and other flu symptoms than during the previous two weeks. The number of states reporting high patient traffic for the flu also dropped, to 39 from 43. (David Goldman / Associated Press)

Nasty flu season showing signs of winding down in U.S.

U.S. health officials on Friday said fewer visits to the doctor last week – 1 out of 16 – were for fever, cough and other flu symptoms than during the previous two weeks. The number of states reporting high patient traffic for the flu also dropped, to 39 from 43.
An arrangement of peanuts is seen Feb. 20, 2015, in New York. The first treatment to help prevent serious allergic reactions to peanuts may be on the way. A company said Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2018 that its daily capsules of peanut flour helped sensitize children to nuts in a major study. (Patrick Sison / AP)

Preventive treatment for peanut allergies succeeds in study

UPDATED: Tue., Feb. 20, 2018, 5:41 p.m.

The first treatment to help prevent serious allergic reactions to peanuts may be on the way. A company said Tuesday that its daily capsules of peanut powder helped children build tolerance in a major study.