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Now: Sat., Feb. 24, 2018, 8:48 p.m. | Search

Lab technologist Sharda Modi tests a patient's swab for a flu infection at Upson Regional Medical Center on Feb. 9, 2018 in Thomaston, Ga. U.S. health officials on Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, said fewer visits to the doctor last week – 1 out of 16 – were for fever, cough and other flu symptoms than during the previous two weeks. The number of states reporting high patient traffic for the flu also dropped, to 39 from 43. (David Goldman / Associated Press)

Nasty flu season showing signs of winding down in U.S.

U.S. health officials on Friday said fewer visits to the doctor last week – 1 out of 16 – were for fever, cough and other flu symptoms than during the previous two weeks. The number of states reporting high patient traffic for the flu also dropped, to 39 from 43.

An arrangement of peanuts is seen Feb. 20, 2015, in New York. The first treatment to help prevent serious allergic reactions to peanuts may be on the way. A company said Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2018 that its daily capsules of peanut flour helped sensitize children to nuts in a major study. (Patrick Sison / AP)

Preventive treatment for peanut allergies succeeds in study

UPDATED: Tue., Feb. 20, 2018, 5:41 p.m.

The first treatment to help prevent serious allergic reactions to peanuts may be on the way. A company said Tuesday that its daily capsules of peanut powder helped children build tolerance in a major study.
Scientists examined 2,000 soils and found a new class or antibiotics that can defeat MRSA and other drug-resistant superbugs. (Dreamstime / Tribune News Service)

In soil-dwelling bacteria, scientists find a new weapon to fight drug-resistant superbugs

In a report published recently in the journal Nature Microbiology, researchers describe a never-before-seen antibiotic agent that vanquished several strains of multidrug-resistant bacteria. In rats, the agent – which the researchers dubbed malacidin – attacked and broke down the cell walls of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and cleared the animals’ MRSA skin infections within a day.

Supplement key to slowing wet macular degeneration

According to new research published in the British Medical Journal’s Ophthalmology, the progression of a potentially devastating form of partial blindness, wet macular degeneration, can be slowed by taking a supplement loaded with antioxidants, zinc and copper.
Runner’s Science is a research study on the effects of distance running on the human body. (Dreamstime / Dreamstime)

Runner’s science: Research predicts, prevents injuries in athletes

UPDATED: Mon., Feb. 19, 2018, 3:04 p.m.

Runner’s Science, as the research study is known, studies the effects of distance running on the human body. The project was launched in 2008 alongside the inaugural 26.2 with Donna – The National Marathon to Finish Breast Cancer, a race founded by Mayo Clinic patient Donna Deegan to support cancer research. With almost 10,000 athletes from all 50 states and several countries, the marathon provides researchers with a diverse pool of study participants.

House Call: Making lifestyle changes is important

If your cholesterol is elevated, you’ve had a heart attack or a stroke, or you have higher than average risk of these due to smoking or family history – it’s time to make lifestyle changes that have been proven to lower your risk of those bad things that you really don’t want to get.
WSU's Spokane-based College of Nursing recently was recognized as a "Center of Excellence" in nursing education, one of 15 cited by the National League for Nursing. Dean Joyce Griffin-Sobel heads up the College of Nursing. Dan Pelle/THE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW (Dan Pelle / The Spokesman-Review)

New WSU certificate program aims to give students grounding in public health

UPDATED: Fri., Feb. 9, 2018, 11:40 a.m.

Washington State University is launching a public health certificate program for graduate students. Run out of the Spokane-based College of Nursing, the 12-credit program allows grad students at any of the university’s campuses to study the foundations of public health through courses in epidemiology, health care law and a community-based capstone project.
In an experiment, Ronald Levy, professor of oncology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, successfully used immune boosters to help T cells fight cancer in mice. (Steve Fisch/Stanford School of Medicine)

A cancer ‘vaccine’ is completely eliminating tumors in mice

UPDATED: Mon., Feb. 5, 2018, 12:23 p.m.

After injecting a combination of two immune boosters directly into solid mouse tumors, the research team said the vaccination eliminated all traces of the specifically targeted cancer from the animal’s entire body – including metastases that were previously untreated.
Woodpeckers are shown in the foothills of Mount Spokane in this 2014 photo. (Ron Dexter / Special to The Spokesman-Review)

Woodpeckers show possible brain damage like that in football players

A new report about woodpecker brain tissue raises the possibility that the birds do suffer some consequences. Maybe the woodpeckers are just fine behaviorally. But they have, to the scientists’ surprise, protein accumulations in their brains that resemble those found in athletes with head trauma.
Spokesman-Review columnist Shawn Vestal. (Dan Pelle / The Spokesman-Review)

Shawn Vestal: Spokane schools should stop tiptoeing through sex ed controversy

Not too long ago, a relatively small but relatively loud group of people approached the Spokane School Board to oppose a planned sex-ed curriculum. The result: The process of adopting a comprehensive human growth and development curriculum for middle schools was halted, and the district dove into a bureaucratic public-relations murk.