In brief: Tamoxifen works better over 10 years

Breast cancer patients taking the drug tamoxifen can cut their chances of having the disease come back or kill them if they stay on the pills for 10 years instead of five years as doctors recommend now, a major study finds.

The results could change treatment, especially for younger women. The findings are a surprise because earlier research suggested that taking the hormone-blocking drug for longer than five years didn’t help and might even be harmful.

In the new study, researchers found that women who took tamoxifen for 10 years lowered their risk of a recurrence by 25 percent and of dying of breast cancer by 29 percent compared to those who took the pills for just five years.

Man arrested in subway rider’s death

New York – A man arrested in the death of a New York City subway rider who was shoved onto the tracks was arraigned on murder charges Wednesday and ordered held without bail.

Naeem Davis, 30, was taken into custody for questioning Tuesday. Police said security video showed a man fitting the suspect’s description working with street vendors near Rockefeller Center.

Police said Davis made statements implicating himself in the crime.

Ki-Suck Han of Queens died after being hit by a train Monday at the Times Square subway station.

Barack Black Eagle hosts tribal leaders

Washington – Barack Obama has done something that none of the previous 43 U.S. presidents ever did: He met with tribal leaders every single year of his term.

On Wednesday, the man known as Barack Black Eagle among American Indians met again with 566 leaders from federally recognized tribes from around the United States at his fourth White House Tribal Nations Conference.

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar called it a “promise made, promised delivered,” recalling how Obama had pledged yearly visits with tribes when he first ran for president in 2008. That’s the same year that Obama received his Indian name, after being adopted by Hartford and Mary Black Eagle in a traditional Native American ceremony on the Crow Indian Reservation in Montana.

More promises came at the daylong conference as Obama and many of his Cabinet secretaries said tribes can expect more federal aid during the president’s second term – for education, health care, jobs, food programs and energy projects, among other things.

But while tribal leaders applauded the president’s efforts to reach out on a consistent basis, many said in interviews that they’ll wait and see whether Obama can deliver during a time of budget cutting.

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