Outdoors

Skiers, boarder killed in Cascades

Four men die in avalanches

STEVENS PASS, Wash. – Avalanches just minutes apart killed four people at two resorts Sunday — one burying three skiers at Stevens Pass ski resort in the Cascade Mountains and another sweeping a snowboarder off a cliff in Snoqualmie, Wash.

All four were in out-of-bounds areas of the resorts.

Just before noon, a snowboarder at Alpental, one of four areas at The Summit at Snoqualmie resort, was in an out-of-bounds area with two friends when he triggered an avalanche that caused him to fall about 500 feet over a cliff, authorities say.

Minutes later, the three skiers were killed when an avalanche swept them about a quarter-mile down an out-of-bounds canyon at a popular resort, but a fourth skier caught up in the slide was saved by a safety device, authorities said.

The skiers were among three groups of skiers – about a dozen people in all – making their way through a foot and a half of fresh snow on the back side of Stevens Pass when the avalanche hit. Stevens Pass is about 80 miles northeast of Seattle.

All were buried to some extent, but the men who died were swept approximately 1,500 feet down a chute in the Tunnel Creek Canyon area, King County sheriff’s Sgt. Katie Larson said.

Most of the other skiers, all well-equipped, were able to free themselves and rushed to dig out the victims. They performed CPR on the three men to no avail, Larson said.

The fourth skier who was swept down the mountain, a woman, survived thanks apparently to the avalanche safety device she was wearing, Larson said.

Such devices include wearable airbags that can be deployed to help a person float atop an avalanche rather than being buried underneath it, or inflatable bags that create space between a person’s mouth and the snow. It wasn’t immediately known which kind the woman had, said Deputy Chris Bedker of the sheriff’s search-and-rescue unit.

The men who died were believed to be in their 30s and 40s.

“Most of the people involved in this were well-known to the ski community up here, especially to the ski patrol,” Bedker said. “It was their friends who they recovered.”

Warning issued

Initial reports of the avalanche reached the Sheriff’s Office just after noon, and for some time it wasn’t clear whether the other skiers had also been swept up in the slide.

The Northwest Weather and Avalanche Center on Sunday issued a warning for high avalanche danger for areas above 5,000 feet, saying warmer weather could loosen surface snow and trigger a slide on steeper slopes. The elevation of the avalanche wasn’t immediately clear.

At mid-afternoon, the temperature at the base of the Stevens Pass ski resort was 24 degrees, with light winds and good visibility. The temperature at the top of the mountain was 22 degrees, according to the resort’s website.

John Gifford, the ski area’s general manager, said Sunday that the resort had received 19 inches of snow in the past 24 hours.

Stevens Pass is one of the most popular outdoor recreation areas in the state, with visitors flocking to the scenic site to go cross-country, back-country and downhill skiing, as well as snowshoeing and backpacking.

Deadly season

It’s been a deadly winter in Washington’s mountains. Four people disappeared in vicious storms while camping and climbing on Mount Rainier last month. The four remain missing, and authorities have said they’re hoping to find their bodies when the snow melts this summer.

Across the West, there had been 13 avalanche deaths this season as of Thursday, according to the Colorado Avalanche Information Center, which tracks avalanche deaths in the U.S.

Experts have said the risk of additional slides in the region could remain high all season. They attribute the dangers in part to a weak base layer of snow caused by a dry winter.

Avalanche deaths are more common in the backcountry than at ski resorts. Out of about 900 avalanche deaths nationwide since the winter of 1950-’51, 32 were within terrain that was open for riding at ski resorts, according to the Utah Avalanche Center.

The Associated Press and the Seattle Times contribute to this report.



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Rich Landers

Rich Landers

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