Outdoors

2011: Highlights from the field

This male trumpeter swan, dubbed Solo, returned to Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge for 34-47 for years until he disappeared in the winter of 2010-2011. (FILE The Spokesman-Review)
This male trumpeter swan, dubbed Solo, returned to Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge for 34-47 for years until he disappeared in the winter of 2010-2011. (FILE The Spokesman-Review)

ANNIVERSARIES

140, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

120, National Forest System

75, Lookout Pass Ski Area

75, National Wildlife Federation

50, National Shooting Sports Foundation

50, Cabela’s

25, Spokane River Canoe Classic

20, Inland Northwest Land Trust

TRANSITIONS

Died: Solo, the long-lived trumpeter swan that called Turnbull National Wildlife refuge home for at least 35 years.

Hired: Daniel Picard, 49, Spokane District manager for the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, from Bureau of Indian Affairs in Utah.

Defunct: Peak Adventures snowcat skiing, lost BLM permit after 17 years because of rules protecting wolverine denning habitat.

Defunct: Kaufmann’s Fly Shops in Oregon and Seattle, after 42 years.

Defunct: Tour Des Lacs, two-day September bicycle touring event between Spokane and Coeur d’Alene, after 19 years.

Defunct: “Columbia Country: Sport Fishing the West” syndicated TV outdoor program, after 10 years, produced by Bob Asbury of Liberty Lake.

Debut: “Trout TV,” featuring Hilary Hutcheson and Rich Birdsell, produced by Bob Asbury.

Demolished: Condit Dam, returning southern Washington’s White Salmon River to a free-flowing stream for the first time since 1913.

MILESTONES

A record 273 bald eagles were counted Dec. 29 as they gathered to feast on a big run of spawning kokanee at Lake Coeur d’Alene’s Wolf Lodge Bay.

Native cutthroat trout were restored by the Kalispell Tribe in a 5.5-mile stretch of a Pend Oreille River tributary.

Lead was restricted in fishing tackle at 13 northern Washington lakes where loons are known to nest; lead shot was prohibited at pheasant release sites in Eastern Washington.

Pygmy rabbits of the Columbia Basin, an endangered species, were reintroduced in Douglas County and produced the first kits there in a decade.

An OHV safety course became a requirement for unlicensed drivers operating off-highway vehicles on national forest roads in Idaho by order of the state Legislature.

Motorized vehicle use was prohibited on 3,600 acres of Inland Empire Paper Co. land near Mica Peak.

The bicentennial of David Thompson’s mapping and surveying expedition of the upper Columbia River was commemorated by the Columbia Brigade in 25-foot replica canoes.

Expedition Idaho, the region’s first serious outdoor adventure race, debuted with sleep-deprived teams covering 500 miles in roughly 150 hours.

Stricter food storage rules were enacted in the Kootenai and Idaho Panhandle national forests to help reduce incidents involving bears.

A free fishing class for adults was offered by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and volunteer anglers.

Crystal Mountain Resort near Mount Rainier closed its chairlifts on July 16, ending the longest season in the resort’s 48-year history. The slopes held a record 612 inches of snow – 51 feet – from November to June, 20 inches more than the record set during the winter of 1998-99.


Click here to comment on this story »


Rich Landers

Rich Landers

More Outdoors Columns »
More Outdoors Blog Posts »

Most recent column

Cautious handling a must during catch- and-release steelhead fishing

If there’s a consensus about anything in Northwest fishing circles it’s that steelhead and salmon deserve the highest respect. Their migrations up and down natal streams and survival in the predator-infested nightmare of the ocean set them apart in the angler’s heart. But some fishermen …


Recent blog posts



Outdoors Calendar

Submit Your Event »




Outdoors Photography

More SR Photo Galleries »
More Reader Photos »


Close

Sections


Profile

Close

Contact the Spokesman

Main switchboard:
(509) 459-5000
(800) 338-8801
Newsroom:
(509) 459-5400
(800) 789-0029
Customer service:
(800) 338-8801