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Remembering Pearl Harbor

Japan’s carefully planned attack on the U.S. Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor shocked the world and catapulted America into World War II. Under the command of Admiral Nagumo, the attack force consisted of six carriers and hundreds of planes.

The goal was to eliminate the threat of the Navy’s battleship force to Japan’s expansion. U.S. forces on Oahu were nearly defenseless against the devastating air raid, despite warning signs that were ignored, misread or received too late. Many officers and crewmen were ashore on that leisurely Sunday morning as the bombs began to drop.

Join us as we remember, and honor, the losses and sacrifices of the historic Pearl Harbor attack on its 75th anniversary.

Radioman swam away from torpedoed battleship

By Jim Camden / The Spokesman-Review

Originally published Dec. 7, 2007. Denis Mikkelsen died March 30, 2013, at age 90.

There was a moment on Dec. 7, 1941 – surrounded by smoke on the burning deck of the USS West Virginia, while explosions rocked the ship from below – when Denis Mikkelsen thought to himself: “This is the end.”

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History lesson

With 75 years of perspective, we can re-examine the legacy of Pearl Harbor even as we honor those who served

Raymond Sun: The living memory of the attack on Pearl Harbor is almost extinguished. It’s time to rethink how we want to remember Dec. 7, 1941, 75 years later – and beyond.

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Finding meaning in Pearl Harbor as attack slips from collective memory

Eric Cunningham: The approaching anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor will be greeted by an American public that is quickly losing its collective memory of that fateful event.

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And then there was one

By Cindy Hval / The Spokesman-Review

Ray Garland, 94, is the last living military veteran on the membership roster of the Lilac City Chapter of Pearl Harbor Survivors. At one time the chapter had 125 active members from all over the Inland Empire.

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