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Saturday, May 25, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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East Coast prepares for Hurricane Irene’s arrival

As massive Hurricane Irene advanced toward the Eastern Seaboard with 115 mph winds, officials issued a hurricane warning for the entire North Carolina coast to the Virginia border, New York ordered low-lying hospitals and nursing homes to evacuate, and at least seven states declared emergencies.


File photo - Associated Press

This Sep. 21, 1938 photo shows the Strandway in South Boston with 100-mile-an-hour hurricane winds which struck New England hard. It’s been nearly 73 years since the Great New England Hurricane of 1938-one of the most powerful, destructive storms ever to hit southern New England, as another massive storm bears down.


It’s been nearly 73 years since the so-called Great New England Hurricane — one of the most powerful and destructive storms ever to hit southern New England. The storm now bearing down on the Northeast, Irene, has drawn comparisons to the one from way back then which, according to the National Weather Service, killed nearly 600 people and injured 1,700.

Associated Press

Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones - Associated Press

This September 1938 photo provided by the Boston Public Library shows a damaged ferry boat sitting in shallow water in Providence, R.I., following the deadly hurricane of 1938 that hit the Northeast. It’s been nearly 73 years since the Great New England Hurricane of 1938-one of the most powerful, destructive storms ever to hit southern New England, as another massive storm bears down.


The Great Hurricane produced tides from New London, Conn., east to Massachusetts’ Cape Cod that were between 18 feet and 25 feet, the weather service says. Communities along the Narragansett Bay were devastated. Storm surges of 12 feet to 15 feet destroyed most of the homes along the coast there. A surge of nearly 20 feet left Providence drowning in water. Years later, the Fox Point Hurricane Barrier would be built to try to shield the capital city from repeat devastation.

Associated Press

C&GS Season’s Report Thomas 1938-84/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Dept. of Commerce - Associated Press

This 1938 photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Dept. of Commerce shows the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries building on the south side of Main Street in Woods Hole, Mass., during the Hurricane of 1938. It’s been nearly 73 years since the Great New England Hurricane of 1938-one of the most powerful, destructive storms ever to hit southern New England, as another massive storm bears down.


The Eastern Seaboard from the Carolinas to Cape Cod is in the path of Irene, a Category 3 storm that moved north from the Bahamas Thursday. North Carolina will take the initial blow, National Hurricane Center Director Bill Read said. If the hurricane follows its projected path, it will make landfall along the state’s Outer Banks on Saturday.

Associated Press

NASA - Associated Press

An image provided by NASA shows Hurricane Irene as photographed from onboard the International Space Station at 3:14 p.m. EDT on Aug. 24, 20ll. The image, captured with a 38 mm lens, reveals the eye of the storm at center of the frame.


Brett Flashnick - Associated Press

A surfer hits the break of an eight-foot wave at Folly Beach in Charleston, S.C., Friday, Aug. 26, 2011, as Hurricane Irene causes larger than normal swells along the South Carolina coast.


Brett Flashnick - Associated Press

A line worker with South Carolina Electric and Gas repairs a power pole that was snapped by the first wind and rain from Hurricane Irene, blocking the only way in and out of Folly Beach in Charleston, S.C., Friday, Aug. 26, 2011.


The National Hurricane Center warned of tidal surges 5 to 10 feet high in North Carolina, accompanied by “destructive and life-threatening waves.” Irene could inundate the state’s coastal areas with 5 to 10 inches of rain Saturday and up to a dozen inches in some locations, forecasters said.

Associated Press

Jim R. Bounds - Associated Press

Sentara Nursing Center Currituck resident J.T Campbell, second from right, waits to be evacuated in response to a mandatory evacuation order in Barco, N.C., Friday, Aug. 26, 2011, as Hurricane Irene heads toward the North Carolina coast. Most of the residents will be moved to other Sentara Life Care facilities in Hampton Roads, Virginia.


NOAA - Associated Press

An image provided by NOAA is an Aug. 26, 2011 view of Hurricane Irene made by the GOES-east satellite. The hurricane is projected to follow a path up the East Coast from North Carolina to Maine and into Canada.


More than 50 million people live in the projected path of the storm. Some forecasters have said Irene has an outside chance of growing into a Category 4 storm, with sustained winds topping 131 mph. But current forecasts predict that it will diminish to a Category 2 storm after pummeling North Carolina, with sustained winds up to 110 mph as it plows into Virginia, Maryland and Delaware.

Associated Press

The Virginian-Pilot, Amanda Lucier - Associated Press

A line of customers waited on the arrival of generators at Home Depot on Military Highway on Thursday, Aug. 25, 2011 in Norfolk, Va.. Many shoppers said they were prepared to wait all night to purchase generators in advance of Hurricane Irene.


Steven Senne - Associated Press

Fisherman Bill Sweeney, of Vineyard Haven, Mass., collects adult scallops from cages in Lagoon Pond, in Vineyard Haven, on the island of Martha’s Vineyard, Friday, Aug. 26, 2011. Sweeney removed the scallops, where they were placed to spawn, to be released back in the wild in advance of Hurricane Irene. The scallops could be killed if left in the traps during a hurricane.


Susan Walsh - Associated Press

People take sandbags off of a truck as residents prepare for Hurricane Irene in Annapolis, Md., Friday, Aug. 26, 2011.


Gerry Broome - Associated Press

Nags Head police officer Edward Mann speaks with resident Debbie Hickey about Hurricane Irene as it approaches the Outer Banks in Nags Head, N.C., Friday, Aug. 26, 2011. Mann was warning residents who have not evacuated that assistance will be limited after the storm winds reach 60 miles per hour.


North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York and Connecticut declared states of emergency. In North Carolina, Gov. Bev Perdue included all counties east of Interstate 95, roughly a quarter of the state. Officials set up emergency shelters inland. The Federal Emergency Management Agency established depots for food, water, generators, baby formula and other emergency supplies at Ft. Bragg, N.C.; McGuire Air Force Base, N.J.; and Westover Air Reserve Base in Massachusetts.

Associated Press

Steve Helber - Associated Press

Dan McKee, of Allentown Pa., packs his van with his son Ryan, as they evacuate the Sandbridge area in preparation for the arrival of Hurricane Irene in Virginia Beach , Va., Friday, Aug. 26, 2011.


Steven Senne - Associated Press

Passengers with cars and bicycles prepare to board a ferry departing the island of Martha’s Vineyard, in Oak Bluffs, Mass., Friday, Aug. 26, 2011. The Steamship Authority, which operates ferries between the island and the mainland, has added additional vessels to the schedule in anticipation of the arrival of Hurricane Irene.


Charles Dharapak - Associated Press

With a mandatory evacuation in place, the beach is deserted as Brad Bradley boards up the windows of a restaurant in anticipation of the arrival of Hurricane Irene in Nags Head, N.C., Friday, Aug. 26, 2011 on North Carolina’s Outer Banks.


The latest projections show Irene making landfall Saturday along the Outer Banks between Morehead City, N.C., and Cape Hatteras before pushing north.

Associated Press

Gerry Broome - A

A lone beachgoer is seen in Nags Head, N.C., Friday, Aug. 26, 2011 after evacuations in preparation for Hurricane Irene have left the area mostly deserted. The full force of Hurricane Irene was still a day away from the East Coast but heightened waves began hitting North Carolina’s Outer Banks early Friday.


John Minchillo - Associated Press

Supermarkets in downtown Manhattan were overwhelmed by demand for water and shelves once loaded with gallon jugs were repeatedly cleared out before they could be replenished, Friday, Aug. 26, 2011, in New York. Mayor Bloomberg advised all New Yorkers to gather supplies as the region girded for wind, rain, and flooding as the storm stood poised to bear down on an already saturated New York state.


Jin Lee - Associated Press

A construction worker works on the World Trade Center site on Friday, Aug. 26, 2011 in New York. New York Buildings Commissioner Robert LiMandri has ordered all work at New York City construction sites to be suspended from 2 p.m. Saturday to 7 a.m. Monday due to Hurricane Irene.


Mel Evans - Associated Press

Vehicles line up to get gas at a service area on the Garden State Parkway, Friday, Aug. 26, 2011, near Ocean View, N.J., as many New Jersey shore residents evacuate inland ahead of Hurricane Irene. Irene has the potential to cause billions of dollars in damage all along a densely populated arc that includes Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Boston and beyond. At least 65 million people could be affected.


Brett Flashnick - Associated Press

A family riding in their golf cart are caught in the first bands of rain and wind from Hurricane Irene, Friday, Aug. 26, 2011, in Charleston, S.C. Irene has the potential to cause billions of dollars in damage all along a densely populated arc that includes Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Boston and beyond.

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