Then and Now photo illustrations

December 4, 2012 1:49 p.m.  •  6 comments

Using Photoshop to combine photos from the Spokesman-Review archives and the Northwest Room of the Spokane Public Library, here is a vision of Spokane, Washington.

You can use the j/k or ←/→ keys to navigate up and down this page.


Using an 1909 photo of Riverside Ave., the changes in transportation become evident. Where streetcars once carried shoppers, buses now whisk people from the STA plaza to outlying areas. The historical photo is from the Spokesman-Review archives.

Jesse Tinsley The Spokesman-Review Link

This combination shows where the 1902 Great Northern Depot sat in the middle of what is now Riverfront Park. It’s clocktower was saved for Expo ‘74, but everything else is gone, opening up the space into a meadow where families play and concerts are held.

Jesse Tinsley The Spokesman-Review Buy this photo Link

Many photos of downtown Spokane have been shot from the tiny windows at the top of the Review Tower, including the wintry 1926 photo which is combined with a 2011 photo looking east down Riverside Ave.

Jesse Tinsley The Spokesman-Review Link

This classic view, from the Spokane County Courthouse tower, looks south-southeast over the Monroe St. bridge, which was a steel structure in the early 1900s, but is now an imposing concrete framework.


This photo, which the caption says is from 1911, but may be a few years newer, shows the Fairmont Hotel at far left and the rest of the busy 300 block of W. Riverside.

Jesse Tinsley The Spokesman-Review Link

The large bakery W. Broadway north of downtown Spokane is remembered mostly for baking Wonder Bread, as it was obviously labeled in this 1930 photo, combined with a 2011 image of the mostly-empty facility.

Jesse Tinsley The Spokesman-Review Link

P.M. Jacoy’s started as a cigar store and news stand in 1915 and continues doing business today.

Jesse Tinsley The Spokesman-Review Buy this photo Link

This view looking east from the Spokane County Courthouse tower shows the roaring Spokane Falls, circa 1903, before dams fully contained its fury, as well as many early buildings in the foreground.

Jesse Tinsley The Spokesman-Review Buy this photo Link

As combined with an old photo showing busy shoppers and business people around the Great Western building, the former Crescent and the Review Tower. The big difference today is the 1985 Spokesman-Review building, the curving structure which took the place of the Crescent department store in the middle of the 900 block of W. Riverside.

Jesse Tinsley The Spokesman-Review Buy this photo Link

The former City Market on the corner of Stevens and 2nd in downtown Spokane, was once a spot to buy food staples sold by a variety of vendors a century ago. Now it’s the home base for Allied Fire and Security.

Jesse Tinsley The Spokesman-Review Buy this photo Link

World War II made Spokane a bustling hub for soldiers and civilian workers in the war effort. Ordinary people opened their homes so servicemen stationed locally or passing through could have a taste of home. This is a view looking east on Riverside Ave.

Jesse Tinsley The Spokesman-Review Buy this photo Link

This composite combines a historical image of an unidentified social group, circa 1920s, in the famous Hall of Doges, the luxurious upstairs dining room built by Louis Davenport at his restaurant, and later, his 1912 hotel. Developer Walt Worthy preserved the hall, painted to resemble a Venetian palace.

Jesse Tinsley The Spokesman-Review Buy this photo Link


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