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Election 2009

City responds to Envision claim

The city of Spokane asserted the mayor’s right to “initiate and control litigation” in a court document Wednesday, a claim aimed at Envision Spokane, which argued earlier in the week that the mayor didn’t have the authority to block its Worker Bill of Rights from November’s ballot. In a 12-page response, the city argued that “time is of the essence” for the Spokane County Superior Court to act and strip Envision’s measure from the ballot. Superior Court Judge Salvatore Cozza will hear the case today.

Envision Spokane: Mayor doesn’t have authority to block measure from reaching ballot

Envision Spokane is pushing back against Mayor David Condon, who last week sued to keep the group’s Worker Bill of Rights from appearing on the city’s general election ballot in November. In an official response to the city’s lawsuit, which was filed at Condon’s direction, the group argues that the mayor doesn’t have the authority to prevent the measure from reaching the ballot, and that only a supermajority of City Council members can block any initiative from appearing before voters.

Shawn Vestal: People, not city, should vote on workers’ bill of rights

Are we confused, electorate? I know I am. On one hand, the city of Spokane has, in essence, sued its citizens on behalf of corporations, trying to prevent voters from getting even a peek at an initiative that would enshrine the kinds of workers’ rights that give the business community the night terrors. On the same day, the city sued a corporation on behalf of a river – perhaps as Sierra Clubby a move as we can ever expect from the administration of David Condon.

Condon sues to keep Envision’s Worker Bill of Rights off ballot

Spokane Mayor David Condon is trying to block the Worker Bill of Rights from appearing on the November ballot just a week after the City Council approved the measure for the ballot. The latest measure put forth by Envision Spokane – the group’s fourth to qualify for the ballot – would amend the city charter to require large employers to pay workers a “family wage,” ensure equal pay for equal work regardless of gender or race, and make it more difficult to terminate workers. The measure would make the rights of a corporation secondary to people’s rights.

Workers Bill of Rights proposal qualifies for Spokane ballot

Enough signatures have been collected in Spokane to put a proposed Workers Bill of Rights charter amendment on this November’s ballot. If passed, the newest measure put forth by Envision Spokane would amend the city charter to require large employers to pay workers a “family wage,” ensure equal pay for equal work regardless of gender or race, and make it more difficult to terminate workers. The measure would make the rights of a corporation secondary to people’s rights.

Court orders initiative vote

Envision Spokane, the twice-failed initiative seeking to bolster environmental protection and neighborhood and labor rights, will be before voters again, after a decision Thursday by a state appellate court. The ruling reverses a 2013 decision by a Superior Court judge to remove the controversial measure from that year’s general election ballot. The court ordered the city to put the measure on the next available ballot.

Spin Control: Initiative opponents, right or not, get win

Opponents of two proposed charter changes for Spokane won their fight to keep the initiatives away from voters Friday when Superior Court Judge Maryann Moreno barred them from the November ballot. Cue the huge sighs of relief from the homebuilders and various nice-sounding organizations fronting for local businesses. The groups insisted the two proposals were illegal and “if enacted they would have caused serious harm to Spokane and our economy,” Michael Cathcart, government affairs director for the homebuilders, said shortly after Moreno ruled.

Judge orders 2 initiatives to be blocked from ballot

A Spokane County judge stopped two controversial ballot measures from appearing on November’s ballot Friday, saying they fell outside the scope of the initiative power. Superior Court Judge Maryann Moreno sided with a coalition of government and business interests, which argued that the initiatives attempted to create regulations and protections that were not within the city’s power to enact. They also said the initiatives would hurt local government and business.

Spokane OKS early citizen initiative review

The battle at the ballot box briefly entered City Hall on Monday night, as supporters and opponents of Envision Spokane’s Bill of Rights squabbled over changes to the initiative process. The changes, which dealt primarily with swapping out the legal review of the city attorney for one earlier in the process by the city’s hearing examiner, were passed 6-1, with Councilman Mike Fagan opposing.

Audio


  • Proposition 4 debate: Amendment 5

    Discussion of the fifth amendment – the natural environment’s right to exist and flourish - of Envision Spokane’s proposed community bill of rights for Spokane during a Oct. 8, 2009, debate in the Spokesman-Review newsroom. Representing the campaign for the proposition is Kai Huschke, campaign director for Envision Spokane, the proposition’s sponsor. Representing the campaign against the bill of rights is former Spokane County Commissioner Kate McCaslin.


  • Proposition 4 debate: Amendment 6

    Discussion of the sixth amendment – residents’ right to determine the future of their neighborhoods - of Envision Spokane’s proposed community bill of rights for Spokane during a Oct. 8, 2009, debate in the Spokesman-Review newsroom. Representing the campaign for the proposition is Kai Huschke, campaign director for Envision Spokane, the proposition’s sponsor. Representing the campaign against the bill of rights is former Spokane County Commissioner Kate McCaslin.


  • Proposition 4 debate Amendment 6 extra provisions

    Discussion of provisions to the sixth amendment – determining neighborhoods’ futures – of Envision Spokane’s proposed community bill of rights for Spokane during a Oct. 8, 2009, debate in the Spokesman-Review newsroom. Representing the campaign for the proposition is Kai Huschke, campaign director for Envision Spokane, the proposition’s sponsor. Representing the campaign against the bill of rights is former Spokane County Commissioner Kate McCaslin.


  • Proposition 4 debate: Amendment 7

    Discussion of the seventh amendment – workers’ rights - of Envision Spokane’s proposed community bill of rights for Spokane during a Oct. 8, 2009, debate in the Spokesman-Review newsroom. Representing the campaign for the proposition is Kai Huschke, campaign director for Envision Spokane, the proposition’s sponsor. Representing the campaign against the bill of rights is former Spokane County Commissioner Kate McCaslin.


  • Proposition 4 debate: Amendment 9

    Discussion of the first amendment – enforcement rights - of Envision Spokane’s proposed community bill of rights for Spokane during a Oct. 8, 2009, debate in the Spokesman-Review newsroom. Representing the campaign for the proposition is Kai Huschke, campaign director for Envision Spokane, the proposition’s sponsor. Representing the campaign against the bill of rights is former Spokane County Commissioner Kate McCaslin.