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Las Vegas shooting

A gunman perched high on the 32nd floor of a Las Vegas Strip casino unleashed a shower of bullets down on an outdoor country music festival below, killing at least 58 people and wounding more than 500 in the deadliest mass shooting in United States history.

Now: Sun., March 18, 2018, 11:09 a.m. | Search

Douglas Haig takes questions from reporters at a news conference Friday, Feb. 2, 2018, in Chandler, Ariz. Haig spoke about his experience selling ammunition to the gunman who killed 58 people and injured hundreds more in the Oct. 1, 2017, in Las Vegas shooting, the deadliest in modern U.S. history. Haig, a 55-year-old aerospace engineer who sold ammunition as a hobby for about 25 years, said he met Stephen Paddock at a Phoenix gun show in the weeks before the Oct. 1 shooting in Las Vegas that killed 58 people and injured hundreds more. Haig said he was shocked and sickened when a federal agent informed him of the massacre 11 hours after it unfolded. (Brian Skoloff / Associated Press)

Man who sold ammo to Vegas shooter is charged

UPDATED: Fri., Feb. 2, 2018, 7:32 p.m.

An Arizona man who sold ammunition to the gunman in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history was charged Friday with manufacturing armor-piercing bullets, according to court documents obtained by the Associated Press.
Investigators load bodies from the scene of a mass shooting at a music festival near the Mandalay Bay resort and casino on the Las Vegas Strip on Oct. 2, 2017 in Las Vegas. (Chris Carlson / Associated Press)

Arizona man says he sold ammunition to Las Vegas shooter

An Arizona man named in court documents as a “person of interest” during the investigation of the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history said Tuesday he had met the shooter one time and sold ammunition to him.
Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo discusses the Route 91 Harvest festival mass shooting at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department headquarters Oct. 9, 2017. (Erik Verduzco / Associated Press)

Vegas gunman studied SWAT tactics, music site before attack

UPDATED: Fri., Jan. 19, 2018, 4:26 p.m.

The Las Vegas gunman meticulously planned the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history, researching SWAT tactics, renting other hotel rooms overlooking outdoor concerts and investigating potential targets in at least four cities, authorities said Friday.

In this Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017,  photo, debris litters a concert festival grounds after a mass shooting in Las Vegas. Legal action stemming from the mass shooting at the concert is picking up with lawsuits filed Wednesday, Nov. 15, on behalf of 14 concertgoers. (John Locher / Associated Press)

Las Vegas shooting lawsuits stack up with 14 more filed

Legal action following the mass shooting at a Las Vegas concert is picking up with lawsuits filed Wednesday on behalf of 14 concertgoers, including some who were shot or injured trying to escape and one woman who is so traumatized that she has since mistaken the sound of rain for gunshots.
In this Oct. 17, 2017, photo released by Warner Bros., Stephen Schuck, left, and Jesus Campos appear with host Ellen Degeneres during a taping of “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” at the Warner Bros. lot in Burbank, Calif. Schuck, a building engineer, and Campos, a security guard, were working at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino the night of the mass shooting on Oct. 1. Campos was shot by gunman Stephen Paddock. (Michael Rozman / Associated Press)

Hotel guard describes getting shot before Las Vegas massacre

The gunman who unleashed the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history first wounded an unsuspecting hotel security guard in a hallway who promptly radioed for help, according to a TV interview broadcast Wednesday with the guard and a hotel building engineer whose life he is credited with saving.
People visit a makeshift memorial for victims of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017, in Las Vegas. (John Locher / Associated Press)

Vegas hotel security guard’s disappearance draws attention

The hotel security guard wounded by the Las Vegas shooter inside a hotel before the concert massacre canceled scheduled TV interviews last week because of a medical appointment, a missed appearance that raised questions about the whereabouts of a key witness to the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history.
Las Vegas shooting victim Kurt Fowler embraces his 10-year-old daughter Timori Fowler during a country music performance at Sunrise Hospital, Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017, in Las Vegas. (John Locher / Associated Press)

Dozens gravely wounded in Vegas face long road to recovery

For the dozens of people who remain hospitalized in Las Vegas from the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history, the onslaught isn’t over. The pain lingers. They remain haunted by the uncertainty of their recovery.

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Idaho officials offer prayers for victims in Vegas shooting

Idaho Gov. Butch Otter issued this statement on social media this morning on the Las Vegas shooting: “Idahoans join with our Nevada neighbors and all Americans in praying for the victims of last night’s terrible shooting in Las Vegas.” Also weighing in on Twitter early...

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