February 3, 1995 in Seven

Ride On Over To The Coliseum For Great Rodeo; It’s Worth A Few Bucks

Anne Windishar
 

All this rain may have you thinking it’s spring, which may have you hankering for summer. Which may just get you in the mood for rodeo.

Which is exactly what rodeo organizers are hoping for this weekend, although I don’t think they had anything to do with the Inland Northwest’s tepid winter.

Regardless, the Boot Corral presents the Wrangler ProRodeo Classic tonight, Saturday and Sunday at the Spokane Coliseum. Top professional cowboys, tough livestock, colorful western pageantry, daring bullriders and hilarious clowns will all be on hand.

Cowboys from across the United States and Canada will compete for prize money that will apply toward qualification to the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas in December. Barrelman Flint Rasmussen of Montana and bullfighter Anthony Moore of Oklahoma will be there, too.

Performances begin at 8 p.m. tonight and Saturday and at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday. All seating is reserved. Tickets are $15 for floor seats, $12 and $7 for other reserved seats tonight; $15 and $10 adults, $12.50 and $7.50 for kids 12 and under Saturday and Sunday. Call 325-SEAT, if you’ve got a credit card, or go to any G&B; Select-A-Seat outlet.

Or, there’s boating

If your summer dreams involve more water and wind than dust and daredevils, hit the 40th annual Spokane National Boat Show at the Interstate Fairgrounds this weekend.

Forty-seven exhibitors will provide more than 80,000 square feet of displays of fishing boats, ski boats, yachts and all the latest accessories. This is a great place to do some comparison shopping if you’re an interested buyer, some fantasy shopping if you’re a wishful thinker.

At-the-gate admission is $4, $3 for kids (those under 12 are free).

The show is open noon-10 p.m. today, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday.

Spectators needed

Skiers at Schweitzer will be helping celebrate the 10th anniversary of Jimmie Heuga’s Ski Express, a unique fundraiser aimed at raising money for multiple sclerosis.

The Ski Express started when international skiing greats skied more than a million combined vertical feet in honor of Heuga, who was diagnosed with MS at the height of his ski-racing career. This year, Schweitzer is one of 29 resorts that will hold a daylong competition to contribute to the cause.

Teams of three skiers with at least one female will compete in a fourhour marathon and giant slalom. Winners are determined by total vertical feet skied, performance in the giant slalom and funds generated for the event (each team is required to raise a minimum of $1,000 in sponsorships to enter).

There’s more details on the contest but, since its such late notice, it might be fun to go watch some fantastic skiing. Olympic bronze medalist Susie Luby and former U.S. Ski Team member Paul Mahre will be there.

For more info on the contest, call (800) 367-3101.

Music, music, music

There are several unusual music events this weekend that you might want to catch. “The Minky Sisters” will sing tonight at 7 in the Cheney Cowles Museum Auditorium. This trio performs original ditties in a blend of jazz, folk, punk, blues and uncategorical noises.

Based in Seattle, the group is known for its ease with various instruments, from keyboards to kazoos. Cost is $10 in advance (call 458-2256) or $12 at the door.

The music department at Gonzaga University, in cooperation with Gonzaga Prep, is hosting the Second Annual Northwest Catholic High School Honor Band, which culminates with a free performance at 7:30 p.m. Saturday.

Student musicians from Alaska, Montana, Oregon and Washington will rehearse all today and Saturday. Selections for the performance will include original works for wind band by Gustav Holst, Ralph Vaughan Williams and John Barnes Chance.

In Pullman, the Visual, Performing and Literary Arts Committee hosts Anonymous 4, the New York vocal ensemble that specializes in medieval music. The 8 p.m. concert is Thursday in Bryan Auditorium. It’s free.

Also in Pullman, the Washington State University Concert Choir will perform its selections planned for a May visit to Germany. The 8 p.m. program is tonight at St. Thomas More student chapel, NE820 B Street. It’s free but donations will be accepted.

While you’re in the area

You can also catch Washington’s Junior Miss Program in Pullman this weekend at the Beasley Performing Arts Coliseum.

Thirty-seven high school seniors from around the state will compete for $9,000 in scholarships and awards. Tickets for tonight’s 7:30 performance are $7.50, $5.50 for students; tickets for the Saturday 7:30 p.m. performance are $10, $8 for students. Tickets are available through Select-a-Seat.

On stage

The magical fairy tale of “Cinderella” comes to Metaline Falls on Saturday at the Cutter Theatre. The play features 50 local children and adults, as directed by the Missoula Children’s Theatre.

Curtain is at 3 and 7 p.m. Tickets are $3 and are available at the door or by calling 446-4108.

Back in Pullman, you can catch the one-woman production of “How She Played the Game,” a drama which brings to life moments in the history of women athletes. The 7 p.m. production is tonight and is free.

Next week

Three acclaimed authors and WSU alumni return to Pullman Wednesday for an evening of literary readings. Sherman Alexie, Yvonne Higgins and Arthur Tulee will share the stage to present some of their favorite works.

It begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Fine Arts Auditorium. It’s free.

Joe Clark, the tough former high school principal and educator depicted in the movie “Lean on Me,” will speak at GU at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the Spokane Room of the COG. His presentation is titled “From Disgrace to Amazing Grace.” Admission is $2.

Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Spokane artist Rob Johnson will speak in the auditorium of the Cheney Cowles Museum. His free presentation is titled “Furniture to Firearms: The Art of Rob Johnson.”

MEMO: This is a sidebar that appeared with this story: Inside/outside Docudramas: “Hoops Dreams” is a superb documentary about two inner-city boys reaching for their fantasy about playing pro basketball. For other entertaining documentaries, try renting “The Thin Blue Line,” Errol Morris’ 1988 look at police corruption in Texas and “American Dream,” Barbara Kopple’s 1989 look at an ill-fated packing plant strike in Minnesota. Over the top: It is early in the season to think about spring runoff. But then it’s never really too early to take a spring-type drive through the Palouse. The rolling terrain is stunning all year. For those who need a reason to go, a great destination is Palouse Falls. This stream thunders with early season runoff and there are great views from the picnic area above the falls. To get there from Spokane, head south on Highway 195 to Colfax, turn off on Highway 26 to Washtucna and take highways 260 and 261 to the state park.

This is a sidebar that appeared with this story: Inside/outside Docudramas: “Hoops Dreams” is a superb documentary about two inner-city boys reaching for their fantasy about playing pro basketball. For other entertaining documentaries, try renting “The Thin Blue Line,” Errol Morris’ 1988 look at police corruption in Texas and “American Dream,” Barbara Kopple’s 1989 look at an ill-fated packing plant strike in Minnesota. Over the top: It is early in the season to think about spring runoff. But then it’s never really too early to take a spring-type drive through the Palouse. The rolling terrain is stunning all year. For those who need a reason to go, a great destination is Palouse Falls. This stream thunders with early season runoff and there are great views from the picnic area above the falls. To get there from Spokane, head south on Highway 195 to Colfax, turn off on Highway 26 to Washtucna and take highways 260 and 261 to the state park.

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