Entertainment


Hockey, Basketball And Art Take The Boredom Out Of Weekend

FRIDAY, FEB. 17, 1995

It’s one of those weekends again. The kind for which, instead of resorting to the usual “there’s nothing to do in this town” mantra, you have to dig deep to unearth the few events that might just hold a glimmer of interest for you.

They’re down there. Just keep digging. Here are a few uncovered by intrepid adventure seekers.

Sports alert

The Spokane Chiefs take on Prince George at 7 p.m. Saturday on the ice at the Spokane Coliseum. They’ll battle Tacoma at 6 p.m. Sunday.

This is a chance to see two sports: the artful command of body over gravity that allows 200-pound men (including their pads) to glide effortlessly across the ice with the singular goal of putting a small black disk into a net or, more exciting, the knack of staying upright while pummeling your opponent with your fist, all the while on skates.

It’s a toss-up which “sport” exacts more response from the rowdy crowd.

Regardless, it’s there for the viewing. All seats are reserved at $9.50 and $7.50. There’s a family section, if you’re interested. But you can’t swear. And really, if you can’t swear, what point is there to hockey?

If you’re up for a drive, you can also catch the Washington State University women’s basketball team as it plays Oregon at 7 tonight and Oregon State at 2 p.m. Sunday. Both games are in Bohler Gym.

Art news

Who says there’s no culture in Spokane? Three art exhibits open this week, making the city a mecca, I’m sure.

An exhibit by 14 Los Angeles artists, titled “Beyond 15 Minutes,” was inspired by Andy Warhol’s observation that everyone will be famous for 15 minutes. To counteract the impression that artists try to shock or attract media attention by being outrageous, this exhibit celebrates artists who are not affected by hype.

The exhibit, at the Cheney Cowles Museum, presents an alternative view of the work of L.A. artists. It focuses on ideas, preoccupations and personal perceptions regarding the human condition.

For the first time in years, pieces from the former MONAC western art collection will be shown as part of a special Cheney Cowles Museum exhibit in the skywalk level of River Park Square.

Beginning Saturday, “Indian Images: Art of the American West” will exhibit about 30 paintings and bronzes, through April 15.

Gonzaga University opens an exhibit of the recent work of its studio art faculty in the Gonzaga Ad Gallery today. The art will be up through March 9. The gallery is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., weekdays. But it’s closed Monday for Presidents Day.

Curtain calls

The Cutter Theatre in Metaline Falls opens “The Boys Next Door” this weekend, a play focusing on the day-to-day adventures of four retarded men who live in a communal apartment under the watchful eye of an increasingly burned out social worker.

It’s funny, yet compassionate, as it peers into the half-lit world of its handicapped heroes, says the press info. Sounds interesting, anyway.

Tickets are $5 and may be reserved by calling (509) 446-4108. They’re also available at the door. Curtain tonight and Saturday is 7:30 p.m.

Wallace’s Sixth Street Melodrama continues its run of “Steel Magnolias” this weekend. General admission tickets are $9, $7 for seniors and students. Reservations are suggested; call (208) 752-8871. Curtain is 8 p.m. tonight and Saturday.

Book signings

Jerry Dolph, author of “Fire in the Hole: The Untold Story of Hardrock Miners,” and Anne Seagraves, author of “Soiled Doves: Prostitution in the Early West,” will sign copies of their books from noon to 1 p.m. Saturday at Hastings in Coeur d’Alene, 101 Best Ave.

Maverick archaeologist Salvatore Trento will be at Auntie’s Bookstore in Spokane to give a slide show and discuss his book, “A Field Guide to Mysterious Places in the West,” Saturday at 7:30 p.m.

The lecture is free. Call 838-0206 for more information.

Music, music, music

The 75-voice Seattle Pacific University Choir will perform at 7:30 p.m. Sunday at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church in Spokane.

The concert, which is free, will include music from a variety of eras, including contemporary music and spirituals.

The Post Falls Arts Commission presents “WinterSong” featuring blue grass favorites Rare Mountain Aire and cowboy poet Glen Bair at Templin’s Resort tonight from 7:30 to 11 p.m.

Tickets are $8 per person in advance or $10 at the door. The price includes snacks; a no-host bar is available.

Later this week

Amalia Mesa-Bains, an independent artist and cultural critic from San Francisco, will give a series of presentations in Spokane Tuesday and Wednesday.

Mesa-Bains, a 1992 MacArthur Award winner, is a mixed-media installation artist. She is in Spokane as part of the National Endowment of the Arts 1995 Consortium titled “Private Vision, Public Dialogue.”

She’ll lecture Tuesday at noon in the Eastern Washington University JFK Library Auditorium. That night at 7:30, she’ll lead a panel discussion titled “A Dialogue about Art, Communities and Individuals.”

She’ll conclude her stay with an 11:30 a.m. lecture Wednesday in the Spokane Falls Community College Art Building. All the events are free.

Finally, James Lavadour, from the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Oregon, will give a slide presentation and lecture at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday in the Spokane Falls Community College Student Union Building, lounges A and B. It’s also free.

MEMO: This sidebar ran with story: GETTING OUT Arctic air confined many of us to indoor activities last weekend, but with the temperatures again above freezing, get out for a brisk walk. The Centennial Trail is one of the treasures of our area; the path is clear and the vistas are frequent and quieting. Particularly nice sections include the path in front of the Washington Water Power Building east for about a mile, the area west of Argonne along Upriver Drive, and the trail along the river north of Liberty Lake.

This sidebar ran with story: GETTING OUT Arctic air confined many of us to indoor activities last weekend, but with the temperatures again above freezing, get out for a brisk walk. The Centennial Trail is one of the treasures of our area; the path is clear and the vistas are frequent and quieting. Particularly nice sections include the path in front of the Washington Water Power Building east for about a mile, the area west of Argonne along Upriver Drive, and the trail along the river north of Liberty Lake.



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