January 7, 1995 in Nation/World

Case Is Far From Over

Jess Walter Staff writer
 
Tags:ethics

More than two years have passed since the standoff at Randy Weaver’s North Idaho cabin, but the case is far from over.

The FBI on Friday disciplined 12 agents involved in the standoff, but other reports, actions and court cases likely will follow.

Among the developments that could follow:

Criminal charges. This is the biggest question mark. For more than a year, Boundary County prosecutor Randall Day has been contemplating whether to charge FBI agents in Vicki Weaver’s death.

Day, who has refused comment on the case, wasn’t available Friday.

“I am confident that Randall Day is going to look at this with great thoroughness,” said Idaho Sen. Larry Craig, who has gotten involved in the case.

Justice Department report. The 542-page report was prepared by two dozen investigators and carries a stinging rebuke of FBI conduct in the case.

Craig has accused U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno of stalling public release of the report, which finds FBI agents violated the constitution and recommends prosecution.

A Justice spokesman said Day has asked that the report not be released until Day has decided whether to prosecute anyone in the case. He is reviewing the report.

Craig said he is losing patience. His staff has talked with Sen. Orin Hatch about hearings on the Weaver case.

“I would encourage the chairman of the Judiciary Committee to bring Attorney General Reno before that committee for a full investigation as to why this has taken so long,” Craig said.

Civil suits. Weaver, Harris and Weaver’s daughters have filed almost $300 million in tort claims against federal law enforcement.

If the government rejects the claims, a lawsuit will follow. The family is also seeking a court order requiring federal agents to follow state laws.

Other reports. The U.S. Marshals Service and the Executive Office of U.S. Attorneys are weighing discipline against deputy marshals and a federal prosecutor, but no decisions have been announced.

The Treasury Department has already completed a report clearing agents with the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms of wrongdoing.

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