January 19, 1995 in City

Grim Welcome May Be Awaiting Smiling Kevin

By The Spokesman-Review
 
Tags:column

“I don’t like living by the rules. I like things my way.” - Kevin Boot, accused killer of Felicia Reese

Word just in from the big house:

Kevin Boot’s murder trial may be months away, but a welcoming committee already is looking forward to the smirking punk’s arrival at the state penitentiary in Walla Walla.

“Little Kevin’s fate awaits him at the penitentiary,” promises Michael “Stickman” Nall, 32, a convicted thief from the Seattle area who is considered enough of a risk to be locked up 23 hours a day in the prison’s maximum security unit.

Nall may be a felon doing hard time, but he understands the outrage our readers expressed over the cocky grin 17-year-old Boot wore in a photograph that accompanied a jailhouse interview.

So the convict decided to write and tell us that Boot, who will be tried as an adult, is likely to get that smile wiped off his smug face should he be convicted and sent to the pen.

“He may be strobe-eyed and sucked into his infinitesimal 15 minutes of media hype over his alleged involvement in what was obviously a cruel and senseless act of violence,” Nall adds.

“However, I assure you Little Kevin, the tough-guy juvenile offender who immediately ratted on his cousin and alleged accomplice, will be on a special list upon his arrival into the adult system.”

Snitches, according to Nall, are lower than pond scum, treated badly and despised by the general prison population.

Child molesters are the second most-hated inmates, followed by child killers and then rapists.

“As you can see,” writes Nall, “Little Kevin tops the list.”

Boot definitely fills the bill as a cowardly snitch.

He and his cousin, Jerry Boot, 16, admit they kidnapped Felicia Reese, 22, after she had parked outside a downtown Spokane hotel to attend a Dec. 27 church conference.

The Boots drove the devout woman to a secluded spot where she is said to have sung hymns and prayed before being executed with a bullet into her brain.

“I was in the wrong place at the wrong time, that’s all,” claims the remorseless Kevin Boot, who had amassed 18 prior convictions and three probation violations, yet skated through our lame excuse for a juvenile justice system.

Kevin swears cousin Jerry pulled the trigger. Jerry says cousin Kevin did it.

“Once they arrive here,” observes Nall, “they’re not so tough.”

That’s the gospel truth, agrees Russ Ward, a penitentiary counselor and former corrections officer at Walla Walla.

Ward recalls one husky 18-year-old with a track record of assaulting staff members while he served time in juvenile lockup.

The kid finally was given a choice: behave or move to scenic Walla Walla.

“He said, ‘Fine, send me. I don’t care,”’ says Ward. “He thought he was pretty tough, but he didn’t last a week in general population.”

The not-so-tough kid was isolated in the protective custody wing - the only place Nall says “snitches, rapos, molesters and punks” can stay safe.

Sometimes, however, safety is a relative term as Spokane’s other infamous Kevin found out last April.

Our very own South Hill rapist, Kevin Coe, had his throat slashed by another inmate who was in protective custody.

With the possibility of spending a lifetime surrounded by that kind of danger facing him, you have to wonder what Kevin Boot has to smile about.

The prospect of making new and interesting friends?

Nall wants all his fellow convicts at the big house to welcome Boot properly should he one day check into this brick and concrete hotel.

The lad “has a rude awakening coming,” he writes. “So feel free to drop any extra copies of Little Kevin’s photo in the mail to me.”

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