March 2, 1995 in City

Aids Education, Arts Bills Die As Legislative Deadline Passes

Jim Brunner Staff Writer
 

fOR THE RECORD CORRECTION: State Rep. Lisa Brown of Spokane is a Democrat. Her party affiliation was incorrect in two stories in Thursday’s paper. Correction published on March 3, 1995.

As the first major deadline for bills passed Wednesday, area lawmakers had their share of pet projects doomed to the legislative graveyard.

Proposals not voted out of committees by Wednesday are considered dead, though lawmakers can try to resurrect bills by tacking them onto other pieces of legislation.

Bills that carry financial costs have until Monday to clear House and Senate financial committees.

House Republicans are using their new majority to push measures that may not have even received a public hearing last year. Some of the more radical measures have been dropped, but GOP leaders are glad to have at least raised the issues.

“We are an idea factory,” said Rep. Steve Fuhrman, R-Kettle Falls. “A lot of the bills I sponsored are trying to educate people there is a problem … even if I don’t have the best solution.”

House Democrats are finding their minority status is tough on their ideas.

“It’s a big contrast,” said Rep. Lisa Brown, R-Spokane. “Two years ago I had bills passing and now I’ll be lucky if they survive cutoff.”

Bills by Spokane-area lawmakers that failed to meeting Wednesday’s deadline include:

AIDS education, House Bill 1492, sponsored by Rep. Larry Crouse, R-Spokane, eliminating the requirement that AIDS curricula be screened for medical accuracy by the state Department of Health.

Arts funding, HB 1307 and HB 1308, sponsored by Crouse, eliminating money for art in state construction projects and abolishing the Washington State Arts Commission.

Child Support, HB 1217, sponsored by Brown, requiring the state to collect 12 percent interest on unpaid child support.

Endangered species, HB 1000, sponsored by Fuhrman, weakening state protection of threatened species. Also HB 1805, sponsored by Fuhrman, denying the Fish and Wildlife Commission authority to designate the Western gray squirrel and the North American lynx as endangered or threatened.

Indigent burial, SB 5010, sponsored by Sen. Bob McCaslin, R-Spokane, requiring counties to pay for the burial of indigent persons.

Prisoner education, SB 5719, sponsored by Sen. Jim West, R-Spokane, requiring inmates to obtain a high school education before using early release time for good behavior.

Health testing, HB 1284, sponsored by Fuhrman, requiring parental notification if children are tested for sexually transmitted diseases.

Bills that are still alive include:

Adoption, HB 1522, sponsored by Rep. Mike Padden, R-Spokane Valley, preventing adoptions from being delayed or denied due to race or national origin. Passed the House, now in Senate Human Services and Corrections Committee.

Arts funding, HB 1135, sponsored by Rep. Cathy McMorris, R-Colville, removing arts funding requirement for prisons, schools and juvenile facilities. An amended version will probably be voted out of committee, McMorris said.

Crime victims, HB 1047, sponsored by Rep. Larry Sheahan, R-Rosalia, strengthening requirements that criminals pay restitution to crime victims. Passed House, in Senate Law and Justice Committee.

Gun control, HB 1104, sponsored by McMorris, repealing restrictions on carrying firearms in the open.

Inmate privileges, HB 1054, sponsored by Padden, limiting inmate privileges including cable TV, weights, and conjugal visits. Awaits House action.

Marriage contracts, HB 1711, sponsored by Padden, allowing written marriage contracts that make divorces more difficult. Awaits House action.

Non-profit organizations, HB 1129, sponsored by Rep. Mark Schoesler, R-Ritzville, reducing taxes on non-profit organizations. Waiting to be placed on House calendar.

Train whistles, HB 1130, sponsored by Crouse, allowing counties to restrict the blowing of train whistles at gated crossings. Waiting to be placed on House calendar.

MEMO: This sidebar appeared with story: Deadline casualties Among legislation that perished Wednesday were bills that would: Ban affirmative action hiring policies. Keep homosexuals from adopting children and to assure civil rights for gays and lesbians. Permit tolls on state highways. Turn over state liquor sales to the private sector. Give universities the right to set tuitions. Prevent the Mariners from calling themselves major league while using replacements players. Permit first cousins to marry.

This sidebar appeared with story: Deadline casualties Among legislation that perished Wednesday were bills that would: Ban affirmative action hiring policies. Keep homosexuals from adopting children and to assure civil rights for gays and lesbians. Permit tolls on state highways. Turn over state liquor sales to the private sector. Give universities the right to set tuitions. Prevent the Mariners from calling themselves major league while using replacements players. Permit first cousins to marry.


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