Idaho

Softball Bats Made Of Titanium Ddangerous, Should Be Banned

I was pitching to Junior on Sunday during an Oliveria family softball outing when the ungrateful teen hit a shot up the middle. It nailed me flush on the right elbow. Three quick thoughts came to mind: 1. OUCH! 2. My reactions aren’t as good as they used to be. OUCH! 3. (after the throbbing had stopped) Thank God the boy wasn’t using a titanium bat.

That $500 bat is a softball equipment manufacturer’s answer to the limited-flight ball. It makes a weird “sproing” sound on impact, adds 20 to 25 feet of distance to a fly ball and increases the chances of serious injury to a pitcher standing only 45 feet away. My 9-year-old daughter probably could hit a homer with one of these rocket launchers.

The bat is a lethal weapon in a summer sport that already sends too many recreation players to emergency rooms. It should be banned before someone is killed - or at least it should be kept out of my children’s hands.

Worms are turning against Tensed mayor

Hmmmm. It’s hard to endear yourself to your constituents when you call them “a bunch of little, wormy, self-centered, back-stabbing people.” And that’s apparently one of the nicer things Mayor Ed Dohrman of Tensed, Idaho, says about his townspeople.

Dohrman has so alienated his Benewah County town of 90 inhabitants (including dogs, cats and jack rabbits) that 31 of them have signed recall petitions. Tensed residents complain about Dohrman’s frequent use of profanity, his refusal to allow council meetings to be tape-recorded and his belittling of them.

This is not a political match made in heaven. Dohrman should resign and save the community the cost and trouble of holding an August recall election - or take a crash course in Dale Carnegie’s “How to Win Friends and Influence People.”

Feds get job done for Yogi & friends

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service did a dandy job bringing Robert Wenger of Chattaroy, Wash., to justice. Wenger is the low-rent hunter who killed a 300-pound grizzly bear 18 months ago and then left her hungry cubs to fend for themselves (read, die). Wenger said the breeding-age female had charged him, but the evidence doesn’t back up his story.

Wildlife officers were obsessed with the case, returning to the scene for exhaustive evidence-gathering and staying awake nights re-creating the bear’s death in darkened living rooms. They cornered their man within a month, and he confessed his dastardly deed. Wenger now faces $9,000 in fines, restitution to a grizzly recovery fund and loss of hunting privileges.

Gee, do you suppose we sent the wrong batch of federal agents to investigate the Ruby Ridge shootings?

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