October 13, 1995 in Seven

Experience ‘Creature’ Discomfort As Garland Celebrates Birthday

Anne Windishar
 

Feeling a little nostalgic? Feel like tossing on a pair of red and blue-lens glasses and screaming in horror at the 1950s classic “Creature from the Black Lagoon”?

The Garland Theater gives you that opportunity tonight through Thursday, as it plays “Creature” for a buck at 9:30 every night (the glasses cost another $1). Be there early, there are sure to be lines.

The event marks the kick-off of the Garland’s 50th birthday celebration that will culminate on the actual birthday, Nov. 17. More events are planned, including a nostalgia display, free popcorn, free admission and more. Stay tuned.

Musical cacophony

Even if your taste in music is narrowly confined to marching-band din, there’s something for you this weekend.

The largest, loudest and most entertaining is the Third Annual Northwest Marching Band Competition beginning at 9:30 a.m. Saturday. Dozens of local and regional high school bands will compete for top honors in music, drumming, drill team and marching.

The preliminaries last through the day; the finals start at 6 p.m. Both are at the Spokane Falls football field. Tickets are $3 for the prelims, $5 for the finals and $7 for all day. Students and senior citizens pay $3, $4 and $6, respectively.

Award-winning singer Deborah Liv Johnson will make a rare appearance in Spokane at the Cheney Cowles Museum at 8 tonight.

Johnson received critical acclaim for her 1992 release, “The Cowboys of Baja Have Stolen My Heart,” a collection of acoustic ballads and blues. Tickets for her performance are $10 and are available by calling 328-5176.

Recording and concert artist David Michael Bilowus will perform a benefit concert at 7:30 p.m. Sunday at The Met. From ocean coasts to the mountains of Ukraine, Bilowus captures the world in musical pictures with his piano compositions.

“My music is a reflection of my life’s experiences, of places I’ve traveled and people who have impacted my life,” he says.

Admission to the concert is $5 per person.

Gonzaga University’s chamber singers and choir will present an all-Bach program at 4 p.m. Sunday in the Antoinette Room of the Davenport Hotel. The program will include Bach’s Cantatas 51 and 37, “G-minor Organ Fugue” and others.

Tickets are $8 and may be purchased at the GU music department (Boone and Lidgerwood streets), Street Music, 117 N. Howard, and at the door. Seating is limited to 200.

Shop and Save

The Junior League of Spokane is holding its Whale of a Sale rummage sale from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at the Spokane Fairgrounds. Don’t miss this one.

More than 300 people have pitched in to set up this sale - basically like a giant department sale with discount prices. You’ll find clothes, sporting goods, electronics, computers, books, luggage, holiday and craft items and more. There’s also a “treasure chest” area with new items donated by more than 100 businesses.

It’s good to get there early, but it also pays to come late. The doors close around 1 p.m. when organizers mark down all the prices on what’s left. Admission to the sale is free.

Miscellaneous stuff

Get back to dancing. The Spokane Folklore Society is at it again (or still) with An Old-Time Country Dance featuring Hired Hands on Saturday at the Corbin Community Center from 7:30 to 11 p.m.

Hired Hands has played at bluegrass and folk festivals around the Pacific Northwest and has won awards for its work - fast fiddle tunes, ballads, sweet harmonies and a touch of gospel.

A potluck begins at 6:30 p.m., so bring a favorite dish to share as well as plates and utensils.

Don’t worry about a partner, though, or the skills to dance. Dances are taught before each set and there are lots of people around to lend a hand.

Admission is $7 for the general public, $4 for folklore members. Dances are smoke, drug and alcohol free.

Whitworth College will offer a variety of perspectives on Africa and some issues facing that continent with a series of lectures titled “Africa Insights” beginning Sunday with a “A Dynamic Church in a Collapsing Society: The Christian Community of Zaire” by Presbyterian teacher Etienne Bote-Tshiek.

The lecture is at 11 a.m. at the Whitworth Community Presbyterian Church. Bote-Tshiek will speak again Sunday at 7 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church.

The Spokane Chiefs play the Kamloops Blazers at 7 p.m. Saturday. Ticket prices vary; call 325-SEAT for information.

Plan ahead

The second program in the Fall, 1995 Wednesday Night Program Series at the Cheney Cowles Museum is at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday in the museum’s auditorium. Stan Cohen from Missoula will look at all aspects of the home front during World War II in his presentation “V is for Victory.”

The lecture is free and open to the public.

Victor Villasenor, author of “Rain of Gold,” sometimes called a MexicanAmerican “Roots,” will speak at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday in the Spokane Community College Lair Student Center.

Villasenor’s book tells the story of his family beginning at the time of the Mexican Revolution. The lecture is free and open to the public.

, DataTimes MEMO: This sidebar appeared with the story: Getting out Face it, the peak of fall color doesn’t just happen on one particular weekend so we can all plan to go out at once and enjoy the changing of the season. And that’s good. It means just about any time this month you can venture somewhere and see brilliantly hued leaves. The season has arrived in earnest, though, in and around the city. Of course you can’t go wrong if you head for Manito and Cannon Hill parks, which, on a sunny day, are simply stunning. But another of our favorite ways to enjoy the seasonal hues is by strolling along the Aubrey White Parkway on the south side of the Spokane River just east of the Seven Mile Bridge. Those inclined to drive can see colorful trees along the Pend Oreille River near Metaline and Metaline Falls, and alongside the road on the drive through Mount Spokane State Park.

This sidebar appeared with the story: Getting out Face it, the peak of fall color doesn’t just happen on one particular weekend so we can all plan to go out at once and enjoy the changing of the season. And that’s good. It means just about any time this month you can venture somewhere and see brilliantly hued leaves. The season has arrived in earnest, though, in and around the city. Of course you can’t go wrong if you head for Manito and Cannon Hill parks, which, on a sunny day, are simply stunning. But another of our favorite ways to enjoy the seasonal hues is by strolling along the Aubrey White Parkway on the south side of the Spokane River just east of the Seven Mile Bridge. Those inclined to drive can see colorful trees along the Pend Oreille River near Metaline and Metaline Falls, and alongside the road on the drive through Mount Spokane State Park.


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