September 22, 1995 in Seven

Summer Is Gone But There’s No Letup In Things To Do

Anne Windishar
 

You’d think it was summer from all the stuff going on this weekend.

There are festivals, ethnic dinners, arts and crafts fairs, western dancing and a disco party. Take your pick. Just don’t wear your polyester suit to the art sale - could cause some stares.

Festivals galore

The St. Joe Outdoor Festival on Saturday is for you outdoors types - held on National Hunting and Fishing Day by no mistake.

The festival organizers hope to show people the safe way to make use of the woods and natural resources. And have a little fun, too. Demonstrations will feature low-impact camping, horse packing, llama packing, fly tying and archery.

Informational booths will be provided by several state, federal and private organizations, including the Forest Service, North Idaho Flycasters and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. Contests will include a muzzleloader shoot and bugling and children activities will be provided as well.

The festival will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Avery, Idaho, about 47 miles up the St. Joe River Road from St. Maries, Idaho.

On Sunday, Fort Walla Walla Museum will hold its forth annual Fall Harvest Festival from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. with field demonstrations of a sheep dog doing its job with a flock of sheep.

There also will be old-fashioned apple-cider pressing, a full range of wool crafts from carding to weaving, leather tooling and saddle cleaning and live animals.

The wood stove will be fired up for baking day. Old-time crafts will be demonstrated, including the making of apple-head dolls, blacksmithing and horseshoeing. And Pacific Northwest antique truck owners are holding an American Truck Historical Society meeting during the festival.

The festival will be at Fort Walla Walla Park off Myra Road. Admission is $3, $1 for children 6 to 12. Younger kids get in free.

Art opportunities

Sick to death of all your angel prints? Looking for something to fill that 10-foot square blank on your living room wall? Hit the Wall-to-Wall Used Art Sale at the Cheney Cowles Museum this weekend.

This sale of new and used art tends to attract an interesting and diverse mix. You’ll find everything from posters and paintings to photographs and pottery. There are also art books, magazines and supplies.

It’s free to the public; you can decide how much you want to spend once you get in. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and Saturday, and from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday.

If you prefer crafts, try Columbia Crest Winery’s Seventh Annual Arts and Crafts Fair on Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Local artisans from Washington and Oregon will present an array of handcrafted items, including country wreaths and dolls, dried fruit and nuts, baskets, wooden toys, wearable art, gemstones, jewelry and more. Ann Ross and her band, “The Friendly Finley Farmer and Her Favorites,” will perform from noon to 3 p.m. Saturday.

Free wine tasting and tours are offered during the fair. Columbia Crest is on U.S. Highway 221 in Paterson, Wash., 28 miles south of Prosser and one mile north of U.S. Highway 14. For directions or more information, call (509) 865-2061.

Dance dilemma

Disco or western? Disco or western? What a choice. Here’s the lowdown on both; you make the decision.

93 Zoo FM is holding a huge Disco Party on Saturday from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. at the Sheraton Grand Ballroom. You’ll get five hours of disco’s best and a shot at several giveaways, including a Caribbean cruise and a juke box filled with your disco faves.

The station originally planned for about 550 people, but ticket sales have surprised them. On Monday, 800 had been sold. Tickets, still available but limited, are available at the radio station for $10 each today and at the door Saturday for $12. There’s a no-host bar as well.

If your tastes run a little tamer, there’s always the Harvest Moon Dance from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday at Cavanaugh’s Inn at the Park, sponsored by New Life Singles Ministries.

Stagecoach West will play. Tickets are available through G&B; Select-a-Seat for $8 in advance and $10 at the door. Call 448-5872 for more information.

Food alert

Eat and dance for a good cause from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday at the sixth annual Salvadoran Dinner & Music at St. Ann’s Church, sponsored by the Peace and Justice Action League of Spokane and the Unitarian Universalist Central America Committee.

The fund-raiser will benefit Ita Maura, a city in El Salvador.

Tickets are $7, $5 for teens, $3 for kids ages 5 to 12 (those under 5 get in free), or buy a family ticket for $25. That’ll get you burritos (chicken or bean/cheese), beans and rice, salad, chips and salsa and lemonade.

St. Ann’s is at 2120 E. First.

Don’t-miss music

The Associated Students of North Idaho College know how to name an event. “Fest” is all you need to say about the college’s three-band festival of music beginning at 2 p.m. Saturday in Fort Sherman Park on the NIC campus in Coeur d’Alene.

The free event is open to the public and features, in order of appearance, Bush Doktor, Citizen Swing and Jambalassy.

Jambalassy is a 10-piece ensemble that plays Caribbean music, known for its dynamic brass section and one of the tightest rhythm sections in the region. The other two bands are Spokane-based.

Miscellaneous

Katja Biesanz will inspire wonder when she digs into the rituals of many cultures and blends them with modern dance at The Cutter Theatre in Metaline Falls at 7:30 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $5 and may be reserved by calling (509)446-4108.

St. John’s Cathedral holds its Annual Antique Show and Sale today from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. to benefit The Cathedral and The Arts Concert Series.

Twenty shops will display their wares and food will be provided by Mary Carson Catering. Admission is $3.

David Roth, described as a mix of Dan Fogelberg, Will Rogers, James Taylor and David Letterman, will sing at 7 p.m. Sunday as part of Unity’s Music to Change Your Life series.

Tickets are $10 in advance or $12 at the door. Call Unity at 838-6518 for more information.

, DataTimes MEMO: This sidebar appeared with the story: Getting out The starting gun for the duck race fires promptly at 12:30 p.m. Saturday on the Division Street bridge. The ducks will be racing to the finish line in front of the Opera House and they’ll be working up a sweat for a good cause. Here’s how it all works: The Shriners are selling little rubber duckies at $5 a pop. You don’t get the duck, however. Each duck has a racing number and they are all dumped into the river. The first duck across the finish line wins its owner a fishing boat and motor, the second duck earns its owner $2,000, thirdplace is a trip for two to Hawaii, fourth place is a trip on Horizon Airlines to anywhere that airline flies. Arrive early and you can buy a duck in the breezeway between the Opera House and the Ag Trade Center; there will be live music to listen to while you wait for the big race. All the money goes to the Shriner’s Hospital for Children.

This sidebar appeared with the story: Getting out The starting gun for the duck race fires promptly at 12:30 p.m. Saturday on the Division Street bridge. The ducks will be racing to the finish line in front of the Opera House and they’ll be working up a sweat for a good cause. Here’s how it all works: The Shriners are selling little rubber duckies at $5 a pop. You don’t get the duck, however. Each duck has a racing number and they are all dumped into the river. The first duck across the finish line wins its owner a fishing boat and motor, the second duck earns its owner $2,000, thirdplace is a trip for two to Hawaii, fourth place is a trip on Horizon Airlines to anywhere that airline flies. Arrive early and you can buy a duck in the breezeway between the Opera House and the Ag Trade Center; there will be live music to listen to while you wait for the big race. All the money goes to the Shriner’s Hospital for Children.


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