August 1, 1996

For Travis, A Virtual Race Begins As Soon As The Real One Ends Triathlon Will Appear With Its Own Page On The World Wide Web In 10 Hours Or So After The Finish

Marianne Love Correspondent
 

Brian Travis will have Coeur d’Alene Triathlon statistics available in participants’ homes before race director Barb Ross takes them to the Post Office.

After Aug. 11’s triathlon, Travis, 24, expects to spend ten hours adding this year’s results to the triathlon’s World Wide Web site.

Then, anyone in the world at any time can read race results at www.cdaonline.com/triathlon. And when they’re finished checking results they can skim through a detailed assortment of triathlon trivia.

On July 14, Travis’ Coeur d’Alene Triathlon site first appeared on the World Wide Web. As co-owner of cdaonline.com and biathlete himself, Travis came up with the idea last fall.

“As my company got off the ground, I decided to go for it,” he said. “I’ve been told it rivals some of the Ironman sites.”

Once they open the site, viewers can follow a colorful set of graphics providing both aesthetics and clear routes to information.

The site currently features several links to information dealing with the event’s history, course maps, sponsors, the youth triathlon and an overview.

Travis has also developed a photo book for the page. So far, he’s donated more than 40 hours over four days of his time to develop the page.

“Because I controlled and created the graphics, layout, programming and whole package, it went together fast,” he said.

Besides time devoted to posting results, he plans to spend about 20 hours next spring to give it a fresh look for 1997.

“The initial development is the biggest investment,” Travis explained. “We also allocated space on the Internet for the site. It’s designed to be a great information resource for athletes from anywhere in the world.”

Donating time to develop the site comes naturally for the 1990 Coeur d’Alene High School graduate because of family triathlon involvement and his computer background, which began while creating line art on an Apple IIE as a student at Borah Elementary School.

His dad, Bill, has competed in triathlons around the world, including Canada, New Zealand and the Hawaiian Ironman.

After serving as Coeur d’Alene’s swim/run coordinator and Triathlon secretary, his mother, Carol Travis, plans to compete locally this year. And Brian himself plans to compete as an individual in next Sunday’s race after participating on relay teams during past years.

“I come from a very active triathlon family, and almost all our family friends are athletes in the field,” he said, “so it was a great honor to do this site.”

In addition to the triathlon site, Travis and his partner, John Cranney, have built a web site for tourists to plan their visits to Coeur d’ Alene.

“We hope to link all tourist-related businesses and events to this site and then advertise them worldwide,” he said. He has also set an ambitious goal to expand on-line opportunities for athletes.

“This is the first step toward an international triathlon on-line service,” he said. “I hope to have every triathlon, run race, bicycle ride and swim, every application and description on a single web site for all the world to use.”

, DataTimes ILLUSTRATION: Photo

MEMO: This sidebar appeared with the story: A TREAT FOR TRIVIA BUFFS Coeur d’Alene Triathlon trivia buffs have a treat in store when they check out the event’s Web site at http:www.cdaonline.com/triathlon. Besides basic information, site designer Brian Travis has included highlights for each of the event’s first 12 years. Here’s a sampling. 1985: The triathlon included 150 individuals and 50 teams. Awards included a $300 first place prize and a trip to Sun Valley. 1986: The run increased to 10K. Prizes included a trip to nationals at Hilton Head, S.C. 1987: Paula Newby-Frazier, winner of the previous year’s Hawaiian Ironman, was the women’s champion. 1988: The swim moved to City Beach, and the bike course changed. 1989: KHQ-TV became a major sponsor. 1990: Mike Plant, voice of the Hawaiian Ironman, was hired to narrate on KHQ. The event received recognition through a five-page/four-color spread in “Triathlete” magazine. 1991: ESPN broadcast clips on the “Danskin Running and Racing Show.” 1992: The event included 837 triathletes, 110 teams and 40 professionals. Ironman champion Mark Allen shattered the course record in 1:52:05. The first Youth Triathlon was held. 1993: The event became known as The Scenic Challenge. Cam Brown and Sarah Harrow led the men’s/women’s pros. 1994: Canadians Carol Montgomery and Frank Clarke won the professionals division, while Coeur d’Alene lawyer John Sahlin took Kootenai County honors. 1995: A record-breaking 900-plus athletes competed. - Marianne Love

This sidebar appeared with the story: A TREAT FOR TRIVIA BUFFS Coeur d’Alene Triathlon trivia buffs have a treat in store when they check out the event’s Web site at http:www.cdaonline.com/triathlon. Besides basic information, site designer Brian Travis has included highlights for each of the event’s first 12 years. Here’s a sampling. 1985: The triathlon included 150 individuals and 50 teams. Awards included a $300 first place prize and a trip to Sun Valley. 1986: The run increased to 10K. Prizes included a trip to nationals at Hilton Head, S.C. 1987: Paula Newby-Frazier, winner of the previous year’s Hawaiian Ironman, was the women’s champion. 1988: The swim moved to City Beach, and the bike course changed. 1989: KHQ-TV became a major sponsor. 1990: Mike Plant, voice of the Hawaiian Ironman, was hired to narrate on KHQ. The event received recognition through a five-page/four-color spread in “Triathlete” magazine. 1991: ESPN broadcast clips on the “Danskin Running and Racing Show.” 1992: The event included 837 triathletes, 110 teams and 40 professionals. Ironman champion Mark Allen shattered the course record in 1:52:05. The first Youth Triathlon was held. 1993: The event became known as The Scenic Challenge. Cam Brown and Sarah Harrow led the men’s/women’s pros. 1994: Canadians Carol Montgomery and Frank Clarke won the professionals division, while Coeur d’Alene lawyer John Sahlin took Kootenai County honors. 1995: A record-breaking 900-plus athletes competed. - Marianne Love

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