August 19, 1996 in Nation/World

Public Periscope

Compiled By Jim Camden From Staf
 
Tags:column

From Public Periscope column, August 26, 1996: CORRECTIONS AND CLARIFICATIONS Last week, we incorrectly reported the name of the road where Pat Mummey lived. The late county commissioner lived on Prairie Crest Road… .An item about the legal tribulations of Bill Wills Jr. and Bradley Wills inadvertently may have left the impression that they are relatively young. Their mother Jeannette Wills called to inform us they are 42 and 39, respectively, and no longer of an age where their parents can watch over their every move. It’s a point well-taken.

Harrowing escape

Former Spokane County Commissioner Pat Mummey returned home Friday after narrowly escaping the Aug. 11 fire west of Spokane. Mummey, who is battling advanced cancer, was escorted out by the Washington State Patrol after the wind-whipped wildfire reached her home on Prairie Creek Road … As a convoy of family members left the area, their caravan was trapped by the flames and had to backtrack, then wait until firefighters dropped retardant to clear the way. Flames touched the sides of the vehicle she was riding in before it reached safety … Mummey spent the next few days in Deaconess Medical Center before returning home. The barn was destroyed, but the home, the tractor and pets are OK.

Bad air

Spokane may soon make the nation’s short list of three cities with the worst carbon monoxide problems … The four violations pushing the city toward the infamous designation occurred at the air quality monitor next to Empire Ford’s service entrance and vehicle drop-off zone at Third and Washington … But don’t say that in front of Councilwoman Roberta Greene, who owns the car dealership with her husband, Nate … “Which location is that?” asked Mayor Jack Geraghty with a broad grin during a recent council briefing. “Don’t even start,” Greene said.

The suit needed an alteration

Prosecutor Jim Sweetser’s new lawsuit against the Spokane County commissioners blew up in his face last week. Sweetser, who’s fighting the union, sued to stop commissioners from including his deputies in a master county labor agreement … But Sweetser was also in line to get a budget increase of $100,000 to fight crime with four new employees. The commissioners said they couldn’t approve the money because the lawsuit prohibited them from taking any action affecting Sweetser’s employees … So Sweetser’s people had to go back to court and amend the lawsuit so they can get the money.

Do as I say

When it comes to fighting crime, Adams County Commissioner Bill Wills has a home-grown philosophy, which he uses to argue against a bigger budget for the county prosecutor: “I don’t think you’re going to stop crime with more deputy prosecutors and money. The way you’re going to stop crime is at home” with “moral values.” … But recent events suggest some members of the Wills family are slipping through the cracks of their father’s system. Last month, son Bill Wills Jr., a former Adams County deputy sheriff, was arrested for fourth-degree assault under the Domestic Violence Protection Act. Earlier this month, another son, Bradley J. Wills, was arrested for drunken driving.

Whose signs were those?

Spokane sign crews have posted nearly 70 “informational” signs on arterials throughout the city, alerting residents to roads that may be resurfaced if the $37.3 million street bond passes. Many have been placed on top of “No Parking” or speed limit signs … Asked if average taxpaying citizens could post signs atop city street signs, Planning and Engineering Services Director Phil Williams said, “No. They’re our signs.” … Which caused us at Periscope to wonder, who does Williams think paid for “our” signs?

, DataTimes MEMO: Public Periscope, published Mondays, is compiled by Jim Camden from staff reports. If you’ve got a question about local government, growth or development, we’d like to help you find an answer. You can write us c/o The Spokesman-Review, Box 2160, Spokane, Wash., 99210. Or e-mail to jimc@spokesman.com. Or fax to (509) 459-5482. Or call Cityline at 458-8800 on a Touch-Tone phone, then press 9120 to leave a message.

The following fields overflowed: CREDIT = Compiled by Jim Camden from staff reports

Public Periscope, published Mondays, is compiled by Jim Camden from staff reports. If you’ve got a question about local government, growth or development, we’d like to help you find an answer. You can write us c/o The Spokesman-Review, Box 2160, Spokane, Wash., 99210. Or e-mail to jimc@spokesman.com. Or fax to (509) 459-5482. Or call Cityline at 458-8800 on a Touch-Tone phone, then press 9120 to leave a message.

The following fields overflowed: CREDIT = Compiled by Jim Camden from staff reports

Get stories like this in a free daily email


Please keep it civil. Don't post comments that are obscene, defamatory, threatening, off-topic, an infringement of copyright or an invasion of privacy. Read our forum standards and community guidelines.

You must be logged in to post comments. Please log in here or click the comment box below for options.

comments powered by Disqus