November 20, 1996 in Nation/World

Northwest Storm Kills At Least 6 Four Die When Slide Swallows Home In Southern Oregon

Adam Lynn Jim Camden And The Associat Staff writer
 

Tuesday’s storm killed at least six Northwest residents, including a Spokane County man who died when a tree fell on his recreational vehicle near Naches, Wash.

Dozens of others were injured in car accidents or by falling tree limbs, authorities said.

Gregory W. Carlson, 29, of Colbert, was crushed about 3:30 a.m. as he was sleeping in an RV parked at the Crow Creek campground, Yakima County sheriff’s deputies reported.

Deputies said heavy snow snapped a large pine tree 25 feet from the ground and sent it crashing into Carlson’s 1973 International motor home.

The victim’s father and uncle - David and William Carlson - also were sleeping in the motor home but weren’t hurt, deputies said.

A Yakima man who was shoveling snow outside his mobile home was killed when moist, heavy snow caused the carport to collapse, pinning him under the debris. Charles J. Wiltsey, 85, was pronounced dead at a local hospital, police said.

In southern Oregon, four people died when heavy rains triggered a mudslide that swallowed a house whole, authorities said.

The disaster occurred about 30 miles northwest of Roseburg, Douglas County sheriff’s deputies said.

Killed were Rick Moon, 46; his wife, Susan Moon, 44; neighbor Sharon Marvin, 40; and a third woman whose name was not known.

The Moons’ son, Justin, and daughter, Rachelle, escaped without injury, authorities said. Their ages were unavailable.

Witness Arnold Ryder, 70, told deputies that Rick Moon screamed at his children to “Run! Run! Run!” just before the house was destroyed. Ryder was injured in the slide.

In Spokane, at least two people were injured by falling tree branches.

About 3:30 p.m., a man trying to clear branches out of the street in Browne’s Addition was hit by a limb at least a foot in diameter.

The man, whose name was not known, sustained serious rib and head injuries, said Lt. Greg Henjum of the Spokane Fire Department. A twig growing out of the branch also was embedded in the man’s neck, Henjum said.

The accident occurred in the 1900 block of West Riverside. Ice and limbs rained down on firefighters who worked to rescue the victim.

The man, bloodied and sucking oxygen from a mask, was whisked to Deaconess Medical Center. He was released Tuesday afternoon.

About 3 p.m., 10-year-old Elizabeth Thies was struck as she walked home from school near Cliff Park.

Thies bruised her hip and leg when a limb from a maple tree hit her on Sound Avenue.

Two people sustained serious injuries in a wreck on Interstate 90 in the Spokane Valley.

The crash occurred about 6 a.m. just west of the Sullivan interchange, Washington State troopers said.

Randyl Longmire, 18, was driving west when he lost control of his car, troopers said.

His 1995 Pontiac Grand Am slid across the median and into eastbound traffic, where it was hit by two cars. Longmire sustained a concussion and lacerated scalp.

William Casner, the 39-year-old driver of one of the other cars, injured his head, neck and shoulders and was hospitalized at Valley Hospital and Medical Center. His condition was not immediately known.

, DataTimes ILLUSTRATION: Color Photo

MEMO: This sidebar appeared with the story: WHEN THE LIGHTS GO OUT If you don’t have power in your residence this morning: Disconnect all electrical heaters and appliances to reduce initial demand and protect the motors from possible low-voltage damage. If you leave home, turn off or unplug heat-producing appliances. Unplug computers and other voltage-sensitive equipment to protect them against possible surges (even if you have surge protectors) when power is restored. Conserve water, especially if you rely on a well. Keep doors, windows and draperies closed to retain heat in your home. Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed. If the door remains closed, a full freezer can keep food frozen two days. Be extremely careful of fire hazards from candles and other flammable light sources. When using kerosene heaters, gas lanterns or stoves inside the house, maintain ventilation to avoid a buildup of toxic fumes. Connect lights and appliances directly to a generator, not an existing electrical system. Leave one light switch in the “on” position to alert you when service is restored. Stay away from downed transmission lines and report them to your utility company.

The following fields overflowed: BYLINE = Adam Lynn Staff writer Staff writer Jim Camden and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

This sidebar appeared with the story: WHEN THE LIGHTS GO OUT If you don’t have power in your residence this morning: Disconnect all electrical heaters and appliances to reduce initial demand and protect the motors from possible low-voltage damage. If you leave home, turn off or unplug heat-producing appliances. Unplug computers and other voltage-sensitive equipment to protect them against possible surges (even if you have surge protectors) when power is restored. Conserve water, especially if you rely on a well. Keep doors, windows and draperies closed to retain heat in your home. Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed. If the door remains closed, a full freezer can keep food frozen two days. Be extremely careful of fire hazards from candles and other flammable light sources. When using kerosene heaters, gas lanterns or stoves inside the house, maintain ventilation to avoid a buildup of toxic fumes. Connect lights and appliances directly to a generator, not an existing electrical system. Leave one light switch in the “on” position to alert you when service is restored. Stay away from downed transmission lines and report them to your utility company.

The following fields overflowed: BYLINE = Adam Lynn Staff writer Staff writer Jim Camden and The Associated Press contributed to this report.


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