November 27, 1996 in Nation/World

Dumped Juror Has Agent Angling For TV Spots

Associated Press
 

Only in LA: Ann-Marie Jamison, an instant celebrity for getting kicked off the O.J. Simpson civil jury Tuesday, already had a talent agent to line up her TV appearances.

Jamison, 25, a 5-foot-7 brown-eyed brunette, was a jewelry saleswoman until a month before the trial, when a department store buyout cost her that job - and freed up her time for the long trial.

But, like so many people around here, she’s also an aspiring actress, who boasts of talents ranging from flute player to aerobics instructor to can-can dancer. Her resume touts her role as a “bikini girl” on the CBS-TV series “Diagnosis Murder.”

“She’s not the normal 70-year-old, unemployed, blue-collar juror,” said her longtime agent, Phil Brock of Studio Talent Group, who spent the morning trying to get her on ABC’s “Good Morning America” and NBC’s “Dateline.”

“She’s an intelligent young woman with a background in musical theater, with a bachelor’s degree from UC (University of California) Santa Barbara.”

But Jamison raised eyebrows in the courtroom from the start. A few days into the trial she asked if the lawyers could all introduce themselves because she was having trouble telling who was representing whom.

The judge, Hiroshi Fujisaki, rebuffed and scolded her when she asked if she could bring candy for the other jurors on Halloween. On Halloween day, she marched into the jury box wearing a purple T-shirt with a bright orange message: “It’s Halloween! Care to Go Bump In The Night?”

On Monday, Jamison giggled and put her hand over her mouth, when plaintiffs’ attorney Daniel Petrocelli read Simpson’s deposition comment that the incriminating Bruno Magli shoes were “ugly-ass shoes.”

But the final straw was a comment about Steve Foster, a technician who was projecting the huge pictures of evidence onto a screen.

“She said that the technician’s tie was hot, that it was a good-looking tie,” Brock said. “Nobody ever told her she couldn’t be human for five hours a day.”

“A jury is not a social club,” the judge said, explaining to the other jurors why he dropped Jamison.

© Copyright 1996 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


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