October 9, 1996 in Idaho

Humanities Funding Exceeds Expectations More Than $1 Million Raised For UI Program To Support The Arts

Associated Press
 

A campaign to endow the Excellence in Teaching the Humanities program at the University of Idaho has raised more than $1 million, exceeding the original goal of $950,000.

More than 600 contributors participated in the five-year drive to support teaching in the areas of art, English, foreign languages and literatures, history, music, philosophy and theater arts.

By reaching the fund-raising goal, the UI was awarded an additional $292,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. With reinvested earnings, the endowment now totals more than $1.46 million.

“The Excellence in Teaching the Humanities program will allow us to offer endless chances to learn, to grow and to come away with a better understanding of the world we inhabit,” said Kurt Olsson, dean of the university’s College of Letters and Science. “Our faculty and students have been given a wonderful opportunity.”

Key support for the campaign included UI history professor Fred Winkler’s $100,000 gift, more than $100,000 from music professor Anges Schuldt and more than $250,000 from the estate of Idaho writer Vardis Fisher and his wife, Opal.

The endowment will be used for:

A two-year “distinguished teaching professor” grant to a faculty member in the humanities for exemplary achievement as a teacher of undergraduates.

Three faculty fellowships to assist the distinguished professor in selected projects.

A visiting professorship to a nationally recognized teacher of the humanities who will offer courses at the Moscow school.

A fund to underwrite guest lectures, film rentals or library purchases to support a group of courses offered in a traditional academic setting or a group of topical short courses, workshops or seminars conducted in student residences.

An annual faculty seminar to assess recent advances in undergraduate teaching, study material commonly taught in the core curriculum and plan activities to broaden student learning.

© Copyright 1996 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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