April 10, 1997 in Features

The Slice It’s Really No Contest For Apple Maggots

By The Spokesman-Review
 

We have a winner.

Thanks to the 61 readers who entered our Caption Contest. Here are a few samples of their offerings.

“I told you not to order extra onion on your Whammy.” - David M. Bennett

“Stop crying. Do you know a way out of this pothole?” - A. K. Kutsch

“OK, OK. We’ll call it Latah Creek. I promise. Just don’t look at me like that!” - Paul Harder

“No, we’re not planting any more lilac trees.” - M. Bolick

“Ooooo-ow. What an ugly wig!” - Margaret Cummings

We liked those and a bunch of others. But we’re declaring Nan Hager the winner. Here’s hers.

“Who transported the homegrown fruit? These apple maggots are killing me.”

Slice answers: Most responding readers said any sprain or break suffered skiing would be a contender for the title of the Inland Northwest’s No. 1 status symbol injury.

But Jim Churchwell, tongue in cheek, suggested it might be a gash on the bridge of the nose incurred when a driver slammed on the brakes and hit his head on the steering wheel after being caught by surprise when the car ahead of him actually stopped for a red light.

Good stuff: Glen Jones has a stapler in his kindergarten classroom that’s at least 30 years old. His dad employed it in a tax accounting office. “It’s a joy for me to watch my kindergarten kids use something that my father once used,” he said.

Cindy Hoffman of Libby, Mont., has kitchen knives, tea balls, a potato masher and pans that once belonged to her great-grandmother, who was a caterer in Hollywood, Calif.

Spokane’s Kristen Vollar wrote: “I have a lot of Gram’s things. She was my best friend and sometimes I feel even closer to her now, especially when I’m in my garden. Gram sure loved her gardening. And I’m just starting.”

Frances Baertsch, 83, treasures a spade that belonged to her mother.

Others told of having special feelings for handed-down items ranging from a bread knife to a rabbit’s foot. Some of these things still see plenty of use.

“My great-grandfather, D. A. Downs, owned and operated a butcher shop in the late 1800s in Guy, Wash., (which later changed its name to Albion),” wrote Janet Lake of Kellogg. “I have a knife from his shop, and use it regularly in my kitchen. It is battered and worn, but still holds a good edge. I think of my family history every time I use it.”

Today’s Slice question: What’s special about your favorite store? , DataTimes ILLUSTRATION: Photo

MEMO: The Slice appears Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Write The Slice at P.O. Box 2160, Spokane, WA 99210; call (509) 459-5470; fax (509) 459-5098. “Spokane celebrity” is an oxymoron.

The Slice appears Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Write The Slice at P.O. Box 2160, Spokane, WA 99210; call (509) 459-5470; fax (509) 459-5098. “Spokane celebrity” is an oxymoron.

Get stories like this in a free daily email


Please keep it civil. Don't post comments that are obscene, defamatory, threatening, off-topic, an infringement of copyright or an invasion of privacy. Read our forum standards and community guidelines.

You must be logged in to post comments. Please log in here or click the comment box below for options.

comments powered by Disqus