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Homeowners Challenge Rezoning Decision By County Commissioners

Thu., Jan. 23, 1997

Gleneden homeowners are going to court to challenge a decision by Spokane County commissioners to rezone a parcel of land north of Timberwood Circle, allowing 55 homes to be built on 11 acres.

The case will be heard in Spokane County Superior Court, with an initial hearing set Feb. 7.

The land was originally zoned for 3.5 houses per acre. The rezone allows up to 7 houses per acre.

Developer Harley Douglass plans to build Gleneden Heights. Lots would average about 6,700 square feet with a network of paths and open space near the center of the subdivision.

Art Meikel, president of the homeowners association, claims the project violates the county’s comprehensive plan.

“We’re just asking that they follow the rules,” Meikel said. “We need to start this process over and see it go as it was intended.”

He said the walled housing project doesn’t fit the definition of a neighborhood and will impact the existing community, including traffic and sewers.

Meikel said the Gleneden homeowners group is trying to raise money to keep its case going.

“If we don’t collect more money, we will have to quit,” he said. “I can’t obligate funds I don’t have.”

Meikel said most Gleneden homes cost about $150,000. If the project goes through, Meikel said he’s concerned individual property values in the neighborhood could drop $20,000 or more.

The rezone requested by Douglass was approved in May by county hearing examiner Michael Dempsey. The decision was later upheld on an appeal to the county commissioners.

Meanwhile, Friends of the Little Spokane River Valley is going before commissioners to appeal the hearing examiner’s decision allowing a 21-unit apartment complex on three acres on the Little Spokane River.

The neighborhood group recently lost an appeal that would have stopped Douglass’ plans to build Hunter’s Pointe, a 40-home subdivision overlooking Little Deep Creek.

Because of financial concerns, the group has not decided whether to continue its appeal to the courts, said Tom Hargreaves, spokesman for the organization. He said it could cost $25,000 to take the matter to court.

, DataTimes



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