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Behavior In Dream Depicts Your Life

Dear Nancy: I’m having trouble with a co-worker who obviously wants to take over my position. He undermines my authority and disregards rules. Other than that, my life is fairly peaceful right now. This dream was vivid and detailed. Rene

I’m leaving my apartment for work. I see a man lying on the ground and I don’t know if he’s dead or alive. I walk by him, thinking someone will be along to help him. After work, he’s still lying in the same spot. I go to my apartment intending to call 911. A friend thinks I shouldn’t get involved, but I make the call anyway. I look out the window and see a woman helping the man. He sits up, and a fire truck arrives with its siren on. It has responded to my call. I wake up.

Dear Rene: The way we respond to circumstances in dreams often depicts how we respond in life. For instance, if you find yourself causing conflict in your dreams, it’s likely you do that in daily life. If you avoid conflict, that might become a pattern in your dreams.

This dream shows you standing on the sidelines, not willing to get involved or drawn into the situation at hand.

A man needs attention and you walk away thinking someone else will help him. Do you tend to hold yourself back in life out of fear of getting involved? Does apathy hold you back?

The male figure in the dream may represent your own masculine nature. Everyone’s personality has both feminine (intuitive and nurturing) and masculine (assertive and practical) aspects. Is your assertiveness and courage weak or dying? Perhaps this lack of assertiveness makes it easy for your co-worker to undermine you.

You mentioned your grandfather was a fireman and a great teacher and confidence builder in your life. The call to 911 could be a call to him for help.

Dreams come to us for different reasons, but they always teach us something about ourselves if we listen. This dream may be an appeal for you to revive your assertiveness, to stand up for yourself and be strong in your convictions. Good luck, Rene.

Tips for readers: There are several types of dreams, some merely repeating our daily activities.

Teaching dreams illustrate who we are and how we respond to the world.

Problem-solving dreams give us insight and suggestions to address and improve uncomfortable situations in our lives.

Visitation dreams connect us with loved ones, living or dead, and are usually meant to comfort, warn or inspire.

Precognitive dreams forewarn of upcoming events.

Visionary or spiritual dreams come from the soul’s highest level and remind us of the sacredness of ourselves, life and all creation.

There are also times, in the dream world, when we can tap into other worlds, other dimensions of life.

Most dreams are problem solving because our psyches are always working on our issues and situations. When we know which type of dream we’re working with, we can glean great richness and substance from it.

This column is intended as entertainment. But psychologists who work with clients’ dreams say that dreams can hold a tremendous amount of significance; a particularly disturbing or repetitive dream may indicate the need to see a therapist.

, DataTimes MEMO: Nancy Huseby Bloom has studied dreams for 18 years. Dreams may be sent to her c/o The Spokesman-Review, P.O. Box 2160, Spokane, WA 99210-1615, or fax, (509) 459-5098. Please send a short summary of the circumstances in your life and include your name, address and phone number. Nancy conducts dream groups on a regular basis. For information, call 455-3450.

The following fields overflowed: CREDIT = Nancy Huseby Bloom The Spokesman-Review

Nancy Huseby Bloom has studied dreams for 18 years. Dreams may be sent to her c/o The Spokesman-Review, P.O. Box 2160, Spokane, WA 99210-1615, or fax, (509) 459-5098. Please send a short summary of the circumstances in your life and include your name, address and phone number. Nancy conducts dream groups on a regular basis. For information, call 455-3450.

The following fields overflowed: CREDIT = Nancy Huseby Bloom The Spokesman-Review



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