November 21, 1997 in Features

The Slice Learning At An Early Age That Life Can Be Like A Revolving Door

By The Spokesman-Review
 

This preschool girl leaving the Review Tower was pushing with all her might inside a revolving door.

She had her head down and didn’t notice when she arrived at the point where she was free to exit. She just kept pushing, until the man with her spoke up. “That’s far enough, Charlotte,” he said. “You only have to go around once.”

More youthful advice on preparing a turkey dinner: Rita Hirst, one of teacher Deanna Watkins’ fifth-graders at John Brown Elementary School in Rathdrum, Idaho, started at the beginning. “Go to the store and buy a turkey,” she wrote at the top of her eight-step list.

Classmate Tyler Spencer offered an alternative: “You shoot it.”

Jayson McMillen specified that after killing the bird, you skin it.

Brandon Jacobs kept his list of directions to four steps, ending with “Bake to instructions on package.”

Amie Aldrich suggested “Stuff with stuffing or etc.”

“Marinate the turkey in lemon juice,” wrote Nathan Bloom.

Ruth Crea, who teaches grades K-4 at Faith Christian School in Mead, also gathered and passed along some culinary tips certain to make for a memorable dining experience.

“You put carrots on it. You put celery on it. You put peppers on it. You put salsa on it. Cook it. That’s all I know,” said Nathaniel Hopkins, who is in kindergarten.

First-grader Matthew Barnes put it like this: “you skin it, stuff it, and cook it. Put vegetables around it. Grandma cuts it.”

Fellow first-grader William Shankman insisted that “you put ketchup and mustard and salt and sprinkles on it.”

“You have to put things on it like carrots and salsa and cereal,” said kindergartner Cecelia Memmot.

Fourth-grader Nathan Diamond knew that a turkey isn’t fast food. “Put it in the oven for about seven or eight hours,” he said.

Jacenta Ford, a third grader, was nothing if not concise. “Buy it and bake it. Stuff it and sew it. Put vegetables around the pan.”

“You cook it in the fireplace,” said John Terreault, a second grader. “Then you take it out of the fireplace. Then you get ready for the big festival.”

Soon John, soon.

Char Rinkuns’ proposal for a doll with a local flavor: “The All Dressed Up with Nowhere to Go Barbie.”

Warm-up question: Could time spent wondering about whether to buy studded tires be expressed as a quadratic equation?

Today’s Slice question: Bad drivers get the attention. But would you agree that most Spokane area motorists are reasonably courteous?

, DataTimes MEMO: The Slice appears Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Write The Slice at P.O. Box 2160, Spokane, WA 99210; call (509) 459-5470; fax (509) 459-5098. Spokane needs variety. Form your own subculture.

The Slice appears Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Write The Slice at P.O. Box 2160, Spokane, WA 99210; call (509) 459-5470; fax (509) 459-5098. Spokane needs variety. Form your own subculture.

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