October 5, 1997 in Features

Storylines America Will Look At Nw Themed Books

By The Spokesman-Review
 

If you like book discussions, tune in to KPBX at 9 p.m. Monday. That’s when StoryLines America, with hosts Lowell Jaeger and Paul Zalis, will begin looking at books exploring Northwest themes.

On Monday, the show will tackle A.B. Guthrie’s “The Way West.” Subsequent books and dates of the broadcasts will be Mourning Dove’s “Coyote Stories” (Oct. 13), H.L. Davis’ “Honey in the Horn” (Oct. 20) and D’Arcy McNickle’s “The Surrounded” (Oct. 27).

And speaking of KPBX, Spokane’s Public Radio station (91.1 FM in Spokane, 91.9 FM in Coeur d’Alene, 101.7 FM in Sandpoint) will broadcast the recent literary reading by poet Tess Gallagher at 12:30 p.m. Monday.

As part of the Auntie’s Voices series, the Gallagher broadcast will feature the author reading from her book of short stories “At the Owl Woman Saloon.”

Writing movies

If you’ve ever wanted to write a screenplay, now’s your chance. You have until Dec. 15 to either come up with something fresh or to dust off that script you’ve been carrying around since college.

Sponsored by the Washington State Film Commission, the inaugural Washington State Screenplay competition is now accepting submissions.

The requirements are as follows:

Scripts must be feature length (which typically means at least 120 pages).

The film must be 75 percent “shootable” in Washington.

And, oh yeah.. entrants must be residents of Washington (sorry all you Idaho readers).

“We need to uncover our buried treasure trove of native scripts so that producers can film Washington stories in Washington state,” said Kathleen McInniss, a partner for the screenplay competition and a publicist for the Seattle International Film Festival.

The submission fee is $25 per script. Five winners will be chosen by a jury of industry professionals, and each finalist will receive a “three-month mentorship and possible development deal.”

The overall winner will be the subject of a read-through performance during the 1998 Seattle International Film Festival. For further details and an application packet, call (206) 517-0040.

Banking on books

Kiwanis Clubs of Spokane is doing its part to create a new generation of readers. Working with the early-childhood reading program Success By 6, the Kiwanis has formed a Children’s Book Bank.

According to a Success By 6 press release, the bank consists of more than 13,000 “new and gently used” books that have been collected through community book drives over the past 18 months.

Organizations wishing to use the bank need to request an application. Once the application is approved, a representative will be invited to visit the bank to choose the needed books.

To request an application, write to: The Children’s Book Bank, 11115 E. 23rd, Spokane WA 99206. For further information about the program, call the United Way office at 838-6581.

The reader board

William T. Youngs, author of “The Fair and the Falls,” will read from his book at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at Auntie’s Bookstore.

Ed McLanahan, author of “Congress of Wonders,” will read at the University of Idaho, in Moscow, at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.

Jo Ann Rice, author of “Ranald MacDonald: Pacific Rim Adventurer,” will read from her book at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Auntie’s Bookstore.

Bill Gulick, author of “Roll On, Columbia,” will read from his historical novel at 7:30 p.m. Friday at Auntie’s Bookstore.

Robert Storch, author of “A Cold Seat on Frosty Morning,” will read from his memoir at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at Auntie’s Bookstore.

Marianne Love, author of “Postcards from Potato e Land” and “Pocket Girdles,” will sign copies of her books at the University of Idaho Bookstore from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Saturday.

, DataTimes


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