Nation/World

Harvard Law School Offers Online Course

One of the nation’s oldest law schools is taking a leap into the future.

Harvard Law School announced Friday that it will offer its first entirely online course later this month, and it will be open to the public.

The free noncredit course, called “Privacy in Cyberspace,” will be taught by Arthur R. Miller, a professor whose research interests include civil procedure and copyright.

“The course is both a pedagogical and technological experiment,” said Jonathan Zittrain, executive director of the law school’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society, which is organizing the project.

The course will begin Feb. 28 and run for the spring term.

Miller is known for a Socratic teaching style, introducing concepts by engaging in dialogue with students. He will pose hypothetical situations to students in Internet discussion groups moderated by Harvard Law School students. When participants think they have a solution, they will face Miller in real-time Internet dialogues in which he will introduce new twists to the scenarios.

Participants may register for the course online at cyber.harvard.edu/metaschool/.

No credits will be offered for the experimental course, officials said, but they hope to learn from the project to offer more cyber-classes in the future.



Click here to comment on this story »







Sections


Profile

Contact the Spokesman

Main switchboard:
(509) 459-5000
Customer service:
(800) 338-8801
Newsroom:
(509) 459-5400
(800) 789-0029
Back to Spokesman Mobile