March 20, 1998 in Seven

Pasty Depot Serves Up Traditional Miner’s Meal

By Correspondent
 

First, a quick primer in pronunciation: pasty doesn’t sound like the same word to describe residents complexions this time of year. Pastee rhymes with nasty.

Next, we’ll dissect these hand-held meals. The pasty featured at the new Pasty Depot in Coeur d’Alene, is a stew-like mixture encased in a pastry crust. They’re loosely related to calzones, pirogis, even potstickers and were originally created as meals for Cornish miners in the 1800s.

While pasties are big in the Midwest, where the owners of The Pasty Depot are from, they haven’t made much of an impression around here. Until this week.

Fittingly, this meat-and-potato turnover made its local debut on St. Patrick’s Day. (Yes, Cornwall is in England, but it’s close to Ireland.)

The Pasty Depot offers several versions including the traditional steak and potato. There’s also a chicken pasty, a vegetarian, along with a beef and pork pasty with carrots, onions and rutabagas. (Bet it’s been a while since you ordered something with that root vegetable in it.)

You can order some gravy on the side to dip ‘em in, or eat them like the folks in upper Michigan do. With ketchup.

Everything at The Pasty Depot is made from scratch, including the pizza-by-the-slice. Each pasty weighs about a pound and costs less than $3.

For now, the place - which is located in a former train depot - serves its stuff strictly for carryout. This summer, picnic tables will be added for dining alfresco.

You can find the Pasty Depot at 601 Northwest Blvd. It’s open daily from 10 a.m. until 7 p.m. For specialty orders - they do make an appetizer-size pasty on request - call (208) 667-2789.

Pretty slick spot

Recently had lunch at City Slickers, a fairly new place in Cd’A that’s equal parts restaurant, nightclub and pool hall. In other words, it’s dark and atmospheric, even on a sunny afternoon.

Despite the cutesy names on the menu - bunkhouse meatloaf, maverick burger and Western dip - the sandwiches were darned tasty.

Except for fish and chips, a chef’s salad and chili, the lunch offerings are sandwiches. The grilled turkey crunch with bacon and Swiss melted in my mouth.

I also tried the “square dance chicken,” which the menu described as “for garlic lovers.” The grilled chicken breast was moist and nicely done served with garlic toast and a creamy garlic sauce, but the dish was pretty tame for anyone expecting a blast of that pungent bulb.

When given a choice between potato salad and fries, go with the former. It’s freshly made and tastes like it. It’s pretty rich, though.

The daily burger special featured saucy, sauteed mushrooms, so it was deliciously messy.

Prices were reasonable, with the most expensive lunch entree ringing in at $5.95. The basic burger goes for $2.75.

Dinner fare consists of steaks, seafood and chicken dishes.

City Slickers is located at 216 Coeur d’Alene Ave., behind the Third Street Cantina. For reservations, call (208) 665-0030.

A little bite of Hawaii

The Aloha Island Grill opened earlier this month in an old Taco John’s with a short menu featuring plate lunches - a Hawaiian tradition built around a main dish, a scoop of white rice and macaroni salad.

Of the three entrees I sampled, I liked the teriyaki beef best. The slices of marinated char-broiled steak were flavorful, if a bit chewy.

The garlic chicken was deep-fried and didn’t taste like much beyond the breading. Ditto for the chicken katsu, though that came with a slightly sweet dipping sauce that livened it up.

On the other hand, the mac salad was tops. And the price was right - generous meals for $4.95. Mini plates go for $2.50.

During its first week open, the grill was hopping and the staff a little disorganized. It looked like the best strategy was to phone in - or fax in - orders and pick them up. There is no seating.

The Aloha Island Grill is located at 1724 N. Monroe. It’s open from 10:30 a.m. until 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday. The number for phone orders is 327-4270. The fax line is 327-4349.

While we’re in the Islands

Huckleberrys is having its first indoor luau featuring pit-roasted pig using organically raised pork from a producer in St. John, Wash.

This buffet will also include a variety of Hawaiian salads, tropical fruits and desserts. (Save me a piece of coconut cream pie.) Coffee and soft drinks are included, but beer and wine cost extra.

The luau is $12, $5.99 for kids. It’s happening from 4 until 7 p.m. Saturday at the Valley store (928-3687) and during the same hours on March 28 at the Huckleberrys on Monroe (624-1349). Call the stores for reservations.

Small bites

Clink’s has closed. But only temporarily, during some updating. “After 24 years and 3 million meals, our kitchen facility is ready for modernization,” reads a card sent to regular customers.

When it re-opens for dinner on March 30, expect some new menu items and the addition of Sunday brunch starting April 5. For reservations, call 328-5965.

Sprout’s closing looks less temporary. Several regulars of that little cafe called asking what happened to their favorite lunch spot. Sorry, but I don’t really know. The sign on the door only says it’s closed and thanks patrons for their support.

It seems odd because the place was always busy. Let me know if you can shed some light.

Restaurants around the country are getting swept up in Titanic-mania. A few spots are serving the doomed vessel’s last supper. I don’t know about you, but that seems a bit ghoulish to gorge on consomme Olga, poached salmon in mousseline sauce, filet mignon Lili, Calvados-glazed roast duckling, roasted squab on wilted cress, asparagus salad, pate de foie gras and chocolate eclairs considering what happened after that dinner in April, 1912.

, DataTimes MEMO: Leslie Kelly can be contacted via E-mail at lesliek@spokesman.com or regular mail to Spokesman-Review, P.O. Box 2160, Spokane, WA 99210.

This sidebar appeared with the story: SOMETHING’S FISHY How can you possibly improve on the classic bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwich? That’s easy. Slap a slab of grilled salmon onto the mix like they do on the lunch menu at Beverly’s. This twist elevates the traditional sandwich into updated Northwest cuisine, especially with the slightly spicy red pepper aioli sauce drizzled on top. Take note: This savory sandwich is served open face, which makes it pretty to look at. But I wanted to pick up my meal, so I requested that all-important extra slice of bread. No problem. The Northwest salmon BLT is $9.95.

Leslie Kelly can be contacted via E-mail at lesliek@spokesman.com or regular mail to Spokesman-Review, P.O. Box 2160, Spokane, WA 99210.

This sidebar appeared with the story: SOMETHING’S FISHY How can you possibly improve on the classic bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwich? That’s easy. Slap a slab of grilled salmon onto the mix like they do on the lunch menu at Beverly’s. This twist elevates the traditional sandwich into updated Northwest cuisine, especially with the slightly spicy red pepper aioli sauce drizzled on top. Take note: This savory sandwich is served open face, which makes it pretty to look at. But I wanted to pick up my meal, so I requested that all-important extra slice of bread. No problem. The Northwest salmon BLT is $9.95.


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