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It’s all good for solo-flying Schneider

Fri., May 21, 2004

The so-called pied-piper of Austin, Bob Schneider, has fronted four of the most popular bands in the Austin scene – Lonelyland, the Scabs, the Ugly American and Joe Rockhead. Now he’s flying solo with his latest release, “I’m Good Now,” on Shockorama/Vanguard Records. Recorded at various studios, “I’m Good Now” is at the same time pristine and rough-edged pop rock with edgy lyrics about heartache, future loves, drug addiction and personal angst.

Born in Ypsilanti, Michigan, and raised in Munich, Germany, Schneider is the son of a professional German opera singer and has been performing since he was a toddler. He first gained professional experience backing his father on drums at numerous moonlighting gigs throughout Germany and as a lead singer under the name Bobby Blues and the Basstones at a University of Maryland at Munich show. A gifted visual artist, he moved to El Paso, Texas, to study art, but soon discovered his true passion was music and moved to Austin to pursue his dream.

His 2001 debut, “Lonelyland,” is the best-selling album in the history of Austin’s Waterloo Records, the city’s premier music store.

With intermingling bits of funk, rap, country and folk, Schneider’s music brings his Neil Young and Paul Simon influences into modern musical sensibilities, a little reminiscent of Beck.

Catch Schneider with Ari Hest and Charlie Mars on Tuesday at The B-Side, 230 W. Riverside Ave. Tickets are $10 at the door.

House party

Spokane has its share of intimate venues to catch singer/songwriters, but this takes the cake: Daniel Gordon hosts his fourth house concert at his home in the Garland District on Sunday, featuring Tracy Grammer.

“My brother lives in Wisconsin, and he hosts house concerts all the time,” Gordon said.

Now when he sees not-so-well-known singer/songwriters on tour, he makes it a point to invite them to perform at his home, promising to pack his living room with 75 attentive guests.

Those who show up are mostly neighbors and friends once-removed, so the atmosphere is always welcoming. Usually folks bring potluck dishes.

“I love doing it because it brings people together in a home,” Gordon said. “They can sit together and listen to live music and talk to the singer during the intermission. It’s not a loud, smoky bar.”

Gordon decided to host the shows after a show he wanted to see at The Met canceled because of poor tickets sales.

“These shows don’t necessarily fill The Met, but they’ll fill my living room, and it’ll be dynamite,” Gordon said.

Grammer and her late partner, Dave Carter, were a fast-rising act in folk music. In four years, the duo released three internationally acclaimed albums and toured with Joan Baez.

Despite Carter’s sudden death in 2002, Grammer carries on.

“I have no choice but to go on singing, and to go on telling our story, on behalf of my brilliant partner,” Grammer states in news release.

Grammer appears at the Gordon House, 3813 N. Normandie St., on Sunday at 3 p.m. A social begins at 2:15 p.m. Admission is $12 in advance, $15 at the door. Call 325-2724 for details.

Club hoppin’

• Portland jazz pianist Dave Fleschner performs a concert at Saint George’s School to benefit the school’s music program. The show starts Saturday at 8 p.m. at Saint George’s School Theatre, 2929 W. Waikiki Road. There is a suggested donation of $10, $5 for students.

• Mootsy’s, 406 W. Sprague Ave., is testing the waters with jazz starting on Sunday at 9 p.m. with pianist Jim Templeton and his new partner, singer Stephanie Brush.

• The second round of B-Side’s battle of the bands comes to an end with Chinese Sky Candy, Pathos, After Eyes Are Gone, and Dee Farmin’s Army on Wednesday at 10 p.m. The cover is $3.

• Seattle’s Left Hand Smoke returns Saturday at 8 p.m. to the Blue Spark, 15 S. Howard. Cover to be announced.

• Matchbook Romance, Maxeen, The Matches, and Bleed the Dreams, play a free all-ages show at 11 a.m. Monday at the outdoor amphitheatre at Spokane Community College.


 

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