November 16, 2005 in Nation/World

Womack wins big at CMAs

Nekesa Mumbi Moody Associated Press
 
Associated Press photo

Lee Ann Womack performs “Twenty Years and Two Husbands Ago” at the Country Music Association Awards on Tuesday.
(Full-size photo)

CMA Awards winners

Entertainer of the Year: Keith Urban

Single: “I May Hate Myself in the Morning,” Lee Ann Womack

Album: “There’s More Where That Came From,” Womack

Song: “Whiskey Lullaby,” Bill Anderson/Jon Randall

Female Vocalist: Gretchen Wilson

Male Vocalist: Urban

Vocal Group: Rascal Flatts

Vocal Duo: Brooks & Dunn

Musical Event: George Strait (duet with Womack); “Good News, Bad News”

Musician: Jerry Douglas, dobro

Music Video: Toby Keith, “As Good As I Once Was”

Horizon Award: Dierks Bentley

NEW YORK – The CMA Awards held its first shindig in New York with its country twang intact Tuesday night, as Madison Square Garden was transformed into the Grand Ole Opry with rootsy performances from Lee Ann Womack, Gretchen Wilson, Sara Evans and Rascal Flatts.

Appropriately, Womack emerged as the leader with three wins, including album of the year for “There’s More Where That Came From.” The album marked her return to more traditional country music after a detour through pop-infused material.

“Oh my God, I love country music!” Womack shouted as she accepted her award for single of the year for “I May Hate Myself In the Morning,” a bittersweet ballad. Earlier in the evening, she won for best musical event for her duet with George Strait, “Good News, Bad News.”

Backstage, she said she hoped her wins would encourage more of her kind of country music.

“Sometimes I think we are scared of real country music but a message like what was in that song, that transcends any boundaries, and a great song is a great song,” said Womack of “I May Hate Myself.”

The Country Music Association uprooted the awards show from its traditional home in Nashville to shine in New York’s international spotlight at one of the city’s most famous venues.

Although New York’s skyline was the visual backdrop for the show and the ceremony had appearances by such noncountry names like Billy Joel, Bon Jovi and Norah Jones, Nashville’s influence wasn’t diluted in the process.

Country music has been criticized in years past for drifting more toward pop, but it seemed the evening’s performers were determined to “keep it country” in the Big Apple. Even country’s most mainstream couple, Faith Hill and Tim McGraw, seemed retro with their performance of “Like We Never Loved at All.”

The show kicked off with a fitting performance by Big & Rich, who have shaken up country by mixing various genres, including hip-hop, in their music. The pair performed “Comin’ to Your City,” crooning: “We’re comin’ to New York City, we’re gonna play our guitar and sing you a country song.”

The show’s highlights included a performance by Garth Brooks in the middle of Times Square. In front of frenzied fans, Brooks sang “Good Ride Cowboy,” a tribute to his friend and fellow country singer Chris LeDoux, who died of liver cancer this year.

New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg appeared, and other comments and quips also helped infuse the city in the show. Vince Gill did his best Bronx accent when he joked, “There’s like a rule here in New York, that you can’t do a show without a guy named Vinnie.”

But it was mainly a Nashville party, which pop’s stars joined as well. Jones played piano while Willie Nelson sang “Still Crazy After All These Years,” and Paul Simon joined the pair and sang “Crazy.” Even Elton John conformed to country, singing “Turn the Lights Out When You Leave” with Dolly Parton.

Keith Urban was a dual winner, winning entertainer of the year and male vocalist of the year. Toby Keith won music video of the year for “As Good As I Once Was”; Wilson won best female vocalist. And Dierks Bentley won the Horizon Award for emerging artists.

© Copyright 2005 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


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