September 4, 2005 in Sports

Patriots, Eagles make some of toughest cuts

Associated Press
 

It was cutdown day Saturday in the NFL. It was also suspension day.

While veterans Hugh Douglas, Jon Ritchie and Sean Landeta were released by Philadelphia and former first-round pick David Terrell was let go by New England, three players were suspended for four games by the NFL – Kansas City offensive lineman John Welbourn, Cincinnati defensive end Duane Clemons, and Cleveland defensive back Michael Jameson.

Welbourn was suspended for four games for violation of the league’s steroid policy. Jameson and Clemons were suspended for an unspecified violation of the league’s substance abuse policy.

The Dallas Cowboys, meanwhile, signed wide receiver Peerless Price, cut this week by Atlanta.

Some of best-known players released were by the teams that met in the Super Bowl last season – New England and Philadelphia

And the New York Giants released quarterback Jesse Palmer, known better for his appearance on the television show “The Bachelor” than for anything he did on the field during four seasons with the team. His spot was claimed by 300-pound Jared Lorenzen, who sat out last season after being signed as a free-agent rookie but beat out Palmer this season.

The Patriots cut Terrell, who was signed in the off-season after being a disappointment in Chicago, which selected him with the eighth overall pick of the 2001 draft. His fate may have been decided when the team traded last week for wide receiver Andre’ Davis from Cleveland.

New England also let go of two other veterans, tight end Jed Weaver and defensive tackle Rodney Bailey, as well as second-year wide receiver P.K. Sam.

The Eagles released two veterans who had been plagued by injuries and 42-year-old punter Landeta, as they got down to the season-opening 53-man roster before the deadline.

The 34-year-old Douglas, who had 37 sacks for Philadelphia, was re-signed by the Eagles last season after being released by Jacksonville, with whom he signed in 2003. Ritchie, who turns 31 tomorrow, had played for Oakland and then the Eagles, but missed most of last season with a knee injury.

The Eagles also signed former Washington wide receiver Darnerian McCants and activated punter Dirk Johnson from the physically unable to perform list. The second move led to Landeta’s release.

Landeta has been trying to outlast Doug Flutie as the last player in the NFL from the USFL, which folded in 1986. Landeta was released by St. Louis last season and signed last month by Philadelphia.

Indianapolis, meanwhile, traded an undisclosed draft pick to Tennessee for linebacker Rocky Calmus.

Cincinnati kept Craig Krenzel, the former Ohio State starter, as its third-string quarterback behind Carson Palmer and Jon Kitna. Krenzel, who started his career with Chicago last season and won his first three starts, was cut by the Bears earlier this summer.

Among the other veterans released were running back Chris Fuamatu-Ma’afala, linebacker Nate Wayne and defensive tackle Tony Williams by Jacksonville; and wide receiver Kevin Dyson and punter Chris Mohr by Washington; running back Mike Cloud and linebacker Kevin Lewis by the Giants, who also signed kick returner Chad Morton.

Pittsburgh released quarterback Brian St. Pierre and Denver released Quentin Griffin, who began last season as the starting running back and second-year QB Matt Mauck, as well as five-year defensive tackle Mario Fatafehi.

Carolina cut veteran punter Tom Rouen and put running back Eric Shelton, its second-round draft pick, on injured reserve with a broken foot.

Tennessee released running back Jarrett Payton, son of the late Hall of Famer Walter Payton. Tampa Bay cut veteran offensive lineman Derrick Deese and rookie lineman Sam Lightbody of Washington State University.

Pittsburgh released wide receiver Fred Gibson, its fourth-round draft pick, as well as veteran tight end Walter Rasby. The Dolphins released veteran defensive lineman Larry Chester.

© Copyright 2005 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


Thoughts and opinions on this story? Click here to comment >>

Get stories like this in a free daily email