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Bush sharply criticized by member of audience


Audience members react as Harry Taylor criticizes President Bush after he delivered a speech in Charlotte, N.C., on Thursday.
 (Associated Press / The Spokesman-Review)
Audience members react as Harry Taylor criticizes President Bush after he delivered a speech in Charlotte, N.C., on Thursday. (Associated Press / The Spokesman-Review)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – President Bush isn’t used to tongue lashings, but he got a scolding Thursday from a North Carolina man who told the president that he should be ashamed of himself.

“While I listen to you talk about freedom, I see you assert your right to tap my telephone, to arrest me and hold me without charges, to try to preclude me from breathing clean air and drinking clean water,” real estate broker Harry Taylor told Bush at a town hall meeting. “I have never felt more ashamed of nor more frightened by my leadership in Washington.”

The audience at Central Piedmont Community College booed, but Bush seemed to take the criticism in stride.

“I’m not your favorite guy,” the president said. “What’s your question?”

Taylor didn’t have one, but he wasn’t finished.

“I feel like, despite your rhetoric, that compassion and common sense have been left far behind during your administration,” he told Bush.

Bush defended his decision to authorize domestic eavesdropping in cases involving conversations between the United States and terrorist suspects or their associates in other countries.

“I’m not going to apologize for what I did on the terrorist surveillance program. … Would I apologize for that? The answer is, absolutely not,” he said to applause.

For all their differences, Bush and Taylor agreed on at least one thing.

“I really appreciate the courtesy of allowing me to speak what I’m saying to you right now,” Taylor said near the conclusion of his reprimand. “That is part of what this country’s about.”

“It is,” Bush agreed.


 

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