March 20, 2007 in Nation/World

10-year sentence advised for soldier

The Spokesman-Review
 

A soldier accused of ordering subordinates to kill three Iraqi detainees should be sentenced to 10 years in prison, a military jury decided Monday.

Staff Sgt. Ray Girouard, who was found guilty Friday of negligent homicide in his court-martial, could have received up to 21 years in prison. He avoided a life sentence when he was found not guilty of premeditated murder.

He was accused of telling soldiers to release detainees they captured during the May 9 raid near Samarra, Iraq, and then shoot them as they fled. He is the last and most senior soldier from the 101st Airborne Division to face trial in the killings.

The commanding general of the 101st Airborne Division must review the sentence before it takes effect, but it is unclear how long that will take. Girouard also gets an automatic appeal of the sentence.

McGRADY, N.C.

Search continues for missing Scout

Warmer weather raised rescuers’ hopes Monday as they searched for a third day for a 12-year-old Boy Scout who disappeared while camping with his troop in the rugged mountains of western North Carolina.

Michael Auberry vanished in the heavily wooded terrain after lunch Saturday with the other Scouts and troop leaders. Searchers found his mess kit late Saturday within a mile of the camp site, but no other sign of him, authorities said.

Temperatures fell to the 20s before dawn Monday, but sunny skies and temperatures in the 50s prevailed during the day. Overnight weather was expected to be milder, with lows in the 40s, but there was a chance of rain Tuesday.

During the night, searchers planned to fly a plane with heat-sensing equipment and have dog teams out, among other efforts.

WASHINGTON

Report: 5 million have Alzheimer’s

More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease, a 10 percent increase since the last Alzheimer’s Association estimate five years ago – and a count that supports the long-forecast dementia epidemic as the population grays.

Age is the biggest risk factor, and the report to be released today shows the nation is on track for skyrocketing Alzheimer’s once the baby boomers start turning 65 in 2011. Already, one in eight people 65 and older have the mind-destroying illness, and nearly one in two people over 85.

Unless scientists discover a way to delay Alzheimer’s brain attack, some 7.7 million people are expected to have the disease by 2030, the report says. By 2050, that toll could reach 16 million.

The new report – based on federal population counts, not new disease research – is the first update of the Alzheimer’s toll since 2002, when it was estimated to afflict 4.5 million people.


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